Garlic and White Bean Dip

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For this simple-as-can-be dip, rich-tasting poached garlic is pureed with convenient canned beans, a little bit of onion and a dash of lemon juice. Use it as a dip for crudités, a topping for bruschetta or even as a spread for a sandwich.

Garlic and White Bean Dip
photographer: Ken Burris
Nutritionist Tested & Approved

Time: 150 minutes (50 minutes prep)

Ingredients
  • 4 cups water

  • 4 heads garlic , cloves separated but unpeeled

  • 1 1/2 cups canola oil

  • 1/2 cup extra-virgin olive oil

  • 1 1/2 cups chopped onion

  • 1/2 teaspoon salt

  • 1 15-ounce can cannellini beans , rinsed (see Tip)

  • 1 teaspoon lemon juice

Directions
  1. To prepare poached garlic and garlic oil: Bring water to a boil in a medium saucepan. Remove from the heat, add garlic cloves and stir to submerge. Let stand until the garlic skins are softened and cool enough to handle, about 50 minutes. Strain the garlic, remove the skins and cut off the hard nub where the clove was attached to the head.

  2. Place the garlic, canola oil and olive oil in a medium saucepan; bring to a gentle simmer over medium-low heat. Reduce the heat to low and maintain a very gentle simmer (it may be necessary to slide the pan to the edge of the burner). Simmer until the cloves are golden and very soft when pressed with a fork, 40 to 50 minutes. Let cool for 30 minutes.

  3. Transfer the cooled garlic to a sieve to drain, reserving the oil. Transfer the garlic to a food processor and puree until smooth, scraping down the sides occasionally. (If it makes more than 1/2 cup, store the extra in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.)

  4. To prepare bean dip: Combine 1/2 cup of the reserved garlic oil, onion and salt in a large skillet. Cook over medium heat until the onion is softened but not browned, 6 to 9 minutes. Stir in beans and cook until heated through, about 2 minutes. Transfer to the food processor, add lemon juice and puree with 1/2 cup garlic puree until smooth. Serve warm or cold. (Store extra garlic oil in the refrigerator for up to 1 week.)

Tip: While we love the convenience of canned beans, they tend to be high in sodium. Give them a good rinse before adding to a recipe to rid them of some of their sodium (up to 35 percent) or opt for low-sodium or no-salt-added varieties. (Our recipes are analyzed with rinsed, regular canned beans.) Or, if you have the time, cook your own beans from scratch.


Nutritional Facts

Servings
16
Serving Size
2 tablespoons
Calories
123
Carbohydrates
12 g
Fat
8 g
Saturated Fat
1 g
Protein
3 g
Cholesterol
0 mg
Dietary Fiber
2 g
Potassium
173 mg
Sodium
139 mg
Yield
2 cups garlic oil and 2 cups bean dip
Exchanges
1/2 starch
1/2 vegetable
1 1/2 fat

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3 replies

ohneclue
ohneclue 2015-03-19 19:41:51 -0500 Report

You do NOT include the tortilla chips shown in the picture. That is misleading because people will ASSUME the "12 grams carbs" includes the chips even though you never state that. While beans are not a bad food, the recipe leaves a LOT to be desired in the helpful category. I'd give it a maximum of 1 for all the time it takes to make the garlic flavored oil for no real reason and then wants us to use canned beans with a cautionary note about high salt in canned beans for convenience sake!! Bizarre.

ohneclue
ohneclue 2015-03-19 19:19:11 -0500 Report

Let me understand this — there's hours and hours available to cook garlic in oil and let it cook for almost an hour a couple of times but NO time to cook beans from scratch? It takes less time to make beans from scratch than to make this garlic oil from scratch. Don't have enough time to cook beans? Do them in one of the newer electric pressure cookers if you don't want to use one of the old fashioned ones. They'll beat the garlic oil time three fold.

ohneclue
ohneclue 2015-03-19 19:13:50 -0500 Report

Let me understand this — there's hours and hours available to cook garlic in oil and let it cook for almost an hour a couple of times but NO time to cook beans from scratch? It takes less time to make beans from scratch than to make this garlic oil from scratch. Don't have enough time to cook beans? Do them in one of the newer electric pressure cookers if you don't want to use one of the old fashioned ones. They'll beat the garlic oil time three fold.