Pickled Beets

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Tangy pickled beets are a summertime favorite. Try them as a garnish for a Greek salad or as part of a relish tray at your next summer barbecue.

 Pickled Beets
photographer: Ken Burris
Nutritionist Tested & Approved
Ingredients
  • Total Time: 40 minutes

  • 3 1/2 pounds beets, peeled and cut into 1/8- to 1/4-inch-thick slices (about 11 cups)

  • 1 tablespoon pickling spice

  • 3 cups distilled white vinegar, or cider vinegar

  • 3 cups water

  • 2 tablespoons plus 2 teaspoons sea salt

  • 2 tablespoons sugar

Directions
  1. Cover and refrigerate for up to 1 month. | Equipment: 6 pint-size (2-cup) canning jars or similar-size tempered-glass or heatproof-plastic containers with lids

  2. 6 pint jars (about 12 cups)

  3. Place a large bowl of ice water next to the stove. Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add about a third of the beet slices, cover, return to a boil and cook for 5 minutes. Use a slotted spoon to transfer the beets to the ice water to cool. Repeat with the two remaining batches of beets.

  4. Drain the cooled beets and divide among 6 pint-size (2-cup) canning jars or similar-size tempered-glass or heatproof-plastic containers with lids. Add 1/2 teaspoon of pickling spice to each jar.

  5. Combine vinegar, 3 cups water, salt and sugar in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil and stir until the salt and sugar dissolve. Boil for 2 minutes. Remove from the heat.

  6. Carefully fill jars (or containers) with the brine to within 1/2 inch of the rim, covering the beets completely. (Discard any leftover brine.)

  7. Place the lids on the jars (or containers). Refrigerate for at least 24 hours before serving. Store in the refrigerator for up to 1 month.


Nutritional Facts

Servings
25
Per 1/4-cup serving
Calories
19
Carbohydrates
4g
Fat
0g
Saturated Fat
0g
Monounsaturated Fat
0g
Protein
1g
Cholesterol
0mg
Dietary Fiber
1g
Potassium
130mg
Sodium
90mg
Added Sugars
0g
Exchanges
free food
Carbohydrate Servings
0

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2 replies

ohneclue
ohneclue 2013-09-10 18:10:58 -0500 Report

If you are assuming adding vinegar to a recipe will lower blood sugar, don't. The only vinegar tested that lowered blood sugar was apple cider vinegar so there's no reason to recommend recipes with balsamic vinegar (3-4 times the sugar of ACV), distilled vinegar, sherry or rice wine vinegar and any other vinegar as having the same effect. Scientifically inaccurate. That's like saying aspirin and acetaminophen are interchangeable and the same when they are not.