If you have diabetes and feel like a prune - it's time to make some changes.

The human body is constantly losing water, especially in the warm summer months. With diabetes, staying hydrated can affect overall health, blood sugar control and appetite satiation.

How does diabetes affect my hydration status?

Even when diabetes is masterfully controlled, fluctuations in blood sugars persist. The body's smart response mechanism is hard-wired to get rid of extra sugar in the bloodstream.

When glucose levels are running high, the kidneys work overtime to flush out the sugar - which is the root cause of those extra bathroom trips. With this fluid deficit, the level of thirst increases to combat the dehydrating situation at hand.

Feeling tired?

With high blood sugars there's also a lack of insulin. Insulin allows the body's cells to use sugar for energy. When sugar is stuck in the bloodstream without access to the body's cells, fatigue sets in.

Why does drinking water make my blood sugar better?

Drinking water not only increases the flushing of sugar by the kidneys, but it causes hemodilution (it adds more water to the bloodstream). With more water, the sugar occupies less of the blood volume producing lower blood sugars.

According to Greatist, 60% of the body is made of water and 20% of our daily intake actually comes from the food we eat.

How much water do I need?

For healthy individuals the NIH states : "The recommended total daily fluid intake of 3,000 ml for men and of 2,200 ml for women is more than adequate." That's about 101 oz for men and 74 oz for women.

See your health care provider to make adjustments in your diabetes regimen and for suggestions on your hydration health.

To learn more about this topic:
How Weather Changes Can Affect Your Blood Sugar
Good Beverage Options for Diabetics
Chia Seeds Help Control Appetite and Blood Sugar