Jewels Doskicz is a registered nurse, freelance writer, patient advocate, health coach, and long-distance cyclist. Jewels is the moderator of Diabetic Connect’s weekly #DCDE Twitter chat, and she and her daughter both live healthfully with type 1 diabetes.

Researchers affiliated with the National Institutes of Health and their colleagues [discovered a BACH2 gene][1] that may play an important role in the development of autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, and multiple sclerosis.

BACH 2 genes regulate the choice between two cells types, regulatory or inflammatory, playing a critical role in human health. These genes essentially orchestrate the immune system response; the end goal: a harmonious environment in the human body.

Maintaining a balanced immune system is vital to longevity and health, but constraining and activating immune responses is delicate work. With uncontrolled immune responses the body begins to destroy its own tissue. This is demonstrated with beta cell destruction in type 1 diabetes.

"We found that the Bach2 gene played a key role in regulating the switch between inflammatory and regulatory cells in mice," said National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) researcher Kiyoshi Hirahara, M.D.

The implications of isolating a solitary component in the human immune system and its impact on immunity regulation may have broad applications in the future of medicine. This finding helps explain why people with allergies and varied autoimmune diseases have alterations in their BACH2 gene.

National Cancer Institiute (NCI) researcher Rahul Roychoudhuri, M.D. said, "This may be the first step in developing novel therapies for these disorders."

[1]: !Researchers affiliated with the National Institutes of Health and their colleagues discovered a BACH2 gene that may play an important role in the development of autoimmune diseases such as type 1 diabetes, celiac disease and multiple sclerosis. BACH 2 genes regulate the choice between two cells types, regulatory or inflammatory, playing a critical role in human health. These genes essentially orchestrate the immune system response; the end goal: a harmonious environment in the human body. Maintaining a balanced immune system is vital to longevity and health, but constraining and activating immune responses is delicate work. With uncontrolled immune responses the body begins to destroy its own tissue. This is demonstrated with beta cell destruction in type 1 diabetes. "We found that the Bach2 gene played a key role in regulating the switch between inflammatory and regulatory cells in mice," said National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) researcher Kiyoshi Hirahara, M.D. The implications of a solitary component in the human immune system and its impact on immunity regulation may have broad applications in the future of medicine. This finding helps explain why people with allergies and varied autoimmune diseases have alterations in their BACH2 gene. National Cancer Institiute (NCI) researcher Rahul Roychoudhuri, M.D. said, "This may be the first step in developing novel therapies for these disorders."