ANYTHING IS POSSIBLE!!! HANG IN THERE!!

ufgatorfan92
By ufgatorfan92 Latest Reply 2011-01-06 23:38:30 -0600
Started 2010-12-30 16:16:32 -0600

My name is Scott Wilson and my story is probably like hundreds of other stories with different details in between. I don't necessarily want to dwell on my personal story as much as I would love to educate everyone on organ donation and transplantation, a topic still not that popular, and how this medical procedure changes people's lives.

I am a Type I diabetic and was diagnosed at age 9. Over the years, the disease began to take its toll on my body. In 1990, I had laser surgery on both my eyes to save my vision from the damage caused by diabetic retinopathy. Around the same time I began to visit a nephrologist on a regular basis to help treat my diabetes related renal failure. On December 3, 2008, I was officially listed on the kidney-pancreas transplant list (UNOS) at The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida. By February of 2009, my renal functioning had reached rock bottom, and I was hospitalized and had a peritoneal catheter implanted in my abdomen in preparation for PD (peritoneal dialysis). I began PD in March 2009 and was back to work within a few weeks. I continued to work my carrier position full throttle, delivering the mail on the street daily (6 1/2hours of walking), while completing dialysis nightly. In September 2009, I had a cataract removed from my right eye (diabetes related) and then again in March 2010 a cataract was removed from my left eye, also diabetes related.

On the 693 day (October 25, 2010) the Mayo Clinic called me at 9:19 am, while I was preparing my postal route to inform me they had two potential organs to give me. We rushed to get to Jacksonville and by 6:00 am on October 26, 2010 I was under the knife.

This is a brief overview of my life changing experience, and how it is possible to continue your life when faced by catastrophic circumstances.

I am a new man, capable of doing the things I haven't been able to do since I was 9 years old. I hope this gives you a better idea of whom and what I am. Hopefully, this could be a great avenue to educate everyone on a topic still not that popular. Organ donation and eventual organ transplantation, has changed the lives of millions of people, and I am proud to say I am now one of those millions reaping the benefits of a second chance at a much more fulfilling life!! Miracles do happen…just look at me!!


38 replies

joni55
joni55 2011-01-06 16:43:29 -0600 Report

Thanks for your story Scott. I am so happy you got the transplant. Congratulations. I am an organ donor and this warms my heart.

ufgatorfan92
ufgatorfan92 2011-01-06 16:58:50 -0600 Report

It is amazing to me the number of people who you think the least likely to donate organs to save lives, and end up being the ones who step up and make the ultimate sacrifice. I will NEVER be able to repay my donor's family…EVER!! What an amazingly UNSELFISH choice to make.

When I got my first learner's permit, and knew nothing about organ donation, I too became an organ donor, having no idea how my disease would gradually take the things I so wanted to offer away from me. Life is funny that way. Not to mention, even in my sickest days, my doctors were amazed at how healthy my heart, liver, skin and tissues were. I guess that would have been my donation. It is also kind of strange to think, my newly acquired pancreas and kidney could potentially save yet another person's life if in fact I were able pass them along in the future.

I stand up and applaud your decision to save other people's lives by choosing to be a TRUE HERO…an ORGAN DONOR!! Millions of people just like me are eternally grateful for people like you and your INCREDIBLY GENEROUS donation.

I hope to read many more stories just like mine here at DC. The CURE for this terrible disease is at our finger tips. We will be able to save millions of lives with a REAL cure very very soon!!

God Bless~
In Christ~

Scott
Weston, Florida

joni55
joni55 2011-01-06 17:05:37 -0600 Report

God bless you too Scott. I had no idea that organs could be redonated. Amazing!

Joni

ufgatorfan92
ufgatorfan92 2011-01-06 17:08:23 -0600 Report

Joni~

You know, I am not even sure myself. I was just trying to be HOPEFUL I guess? Either way, I hope to be able to make my contribution when the time comes regardless of what I can give. What I have experienced has humbled me even greater than before. MIRACLES do happen!!

God Bless~
In Christ~
Scott
Weston, Florida

jayabee52
jayabee52 2011-01-06 23:38:30 -0600 Report

As I understand it, one does not have to die to be an organ donor. Kidneys can be donated by a living donor by giving one of the two kidneys. I also understand that a liver can be divided in a living and be transplanted to someone who needs it. If memory serves, the liver grows back, at least partially.

I had no idea that organs could be redonated. But people who have had donations can upon their death donate undamaged organs & tissues as long as they are disease free.

God bless

James

jeffrey9127
jeffrey9127 2011-01-03 09:32:28 -0600 Report

Congratulations on receiving your transplant. Now enjoy your life to the fullest! God Bless you!

ufgatorfan92
ufgatorfan92 2011-01-03 14:10:42 -0600 Report

Jeff~

Thanks a million!! God is good!! I have so many stories, much like you, and the more we tell others, especially newly diagnosed diabetics, the better the SUGAR community will be.

I can't wait for the day YOU and ALL the DC posters tell their miraculous story of healing…oh, it will happen…I believe that with all my heart!!

Thanks again for the interest in my humbling story!

God Bless~
In Christ~

Scott
Weston, Florida

Dr Gary
Dr GaryCA 2011-01-01 18:49:52 -0600 Report

Wow! This is incredible. Thanks so much for sharing your story. You are truly an inspiration!

ufgatorfan92
ufgatorfan92 2011-01-02 06:55:46 -0600 Report

Dr Gary~

All the kind words are so much appreciated. I wish we had a cure for diabetes period and diabetics didn't have to get so sick before being considered for a pancreas transplant. Stem cell is on it's way and I am a huge advocate!! JDRF and the ADA are leading the way to finding a cure I believe…until then, I pray on a daily basis for a cure!!

Thanks again for checking out my story. I can't wait for the day when all the posts here are like mine!

God Bless~
In Christ~

Scott
Weston, Florida

Dr Gary
Dr GaryCA 2011-01-02 17:23:23 -0600 Report

Hey Scott,

You are welcome. Again, your story was an inspiration to me and to others here on Diabetic Connect. You're right, there are a lot of promising developments in the pipeline, lots of good news coming.

Please keep me posted on how you are doing.

And blessings to you, too!

Gary

ufgatorfan92
ufgatorfan92 2011-01-03 07:23:35 -0600 Report

Gary~

It is Day 69 post transplant, and so far so good. The only concern we have encountered since transplant was the elevation in my pancreatic enzymes. After a biopsy of the new pancreas we ruled out rejection, and since I have returned home the lipase and amylase numbers have significantly dropped, almost within the strict guidelines of The Mayo Clinic. None of my surgeons were concerned, even with the initial elevated enzyme numbers…but I am a doctor's worst nightmare because once you educate me on an issue that relates to my over all health, I become obsessive…like with my newly found interest in pancreatic enzymes.

All in all, everything is GREAT!! I am so blessed to have been under the care of a GREAT team of local doctors here in South Florida as well as an AWESOME surgical and recovery team at The Mayo Clinic!! Having a GREAT team of specialists is ESSENTIAL in any diabetic's life.

Once again, I thank you for all the kind words, and truly look for the day when I log in to The Connection and read of all the other miraculous cures. We are close, I know it!!!

God Bless~
In Christ~

Scott
Weston, Florida

Dr Gary
Dr GaryCA 2011-01-03 13:12:50 -0600 Report

Scott, thanks for the additional detail. Fascinating.

And you're right, it is critical to assemble the best treatment team possible. So often patients are afraid to question their doctors for fear of making them mad or offending them. Or they believe -- or want to believe -- that their physician is making the best possible recommendation, or that "one size fits all," and all patients should be treated the same.

Basically, this comes down to superstitious thinking, hoping that if they don't think about it too much, everything will just be fine and the problem will soon go away. I also think that some patients are afraid they will read or learn something that they don't want to know, that will be discouraging in some way, so they hope they can leave everything in the hands of their physician.

When patients are scared, and overwhelmed by the information they have to digest, this is certainly an understandable result. But as you implied, patients need to be involved and educated. Knowledge is power.

I suspect that your treatment team welcomes you as an involved team member. Asking questions helps to assure them that you are tracking along with them, that you understand the potential benefits, the risks, and have reasonable expectations. And educated pateints are also more likely to report symptoms, side effects, anything normal or abnormal, all of which your treatment team needs to know.

The emotional side and the rational side of the brain, when working in tandem, equal empowerment. Add a large dose of Spirit, and the empowerment is multiplied exponentially!

Hope you have a great day!

Gary

ufgatorfan92
ufgatorfan92 2011-01-04 07:21:17 -0600 Report

Gary~

You seem to be a GREAT bank of knowledge. DC should be very thankful to have you on board. I wish I had become active here at DC alot earlier, but i guess better late than never.

I am no doctor, but sometimes the best source of information are those who have lived real life experiences. My PD nurse told me often how she could educate us on the ins and outs of PD but her patients were BETTER sources of information for other patients because they had actually been going through the ups and downs of PD first hand.

I also agree with you, an educated and involved patient is usually the patient that does better. I wasn't always so involved with my endocrinologist or nephrologist…but as I became more concerned about my quality of life and controling my diabetes, I was overly aggressive…almost annoying.

I can't thank you enough for sharing your insight into my story. I am just sorry I didn't meet you and the DC community earlier. This is truly a GREAT outlet for diabetics and their caregivers!!

Hope to hear from you soon. I continue to be an advocate for diabetes and more specifically , an advocate for THE CURE!! We have come a long way just since I was diagnosed…blood monitors, insulin pumps, CGMs, home A1C kits, the list continues to grow. Until we can find a REAL cure, STEM CELL may be the band-aid the SUGAR community needs!!

Always a pleasure chatting with you Gary.

God Bless~
In Christ~

Scott
Weston, Florida

Dr Gary
Dr GaryCA 2011-01-04 13:48:04 -0600 Report

Hi Scott,

I always look forward to hearing from you. Being part of Diabetic Connect has been an incredible experience for me. I receive as much, or more, than I give.

I agree that real life experiences can provide a great education. Hearing what other patients have experienced, in their own words, provides an invaluable perspective.

But I always add a caution when clients talk about what they are learning from other patients. I remind them that each of us is unique, and the experience that one patient has may be very different from another patient's experience. So this is valuable information but should be evaluated with that perspective in mind. Also, a patient may have a very bad experience or a very good experience and, understandably, want to steer other patients toward or away from the approach that their physician took and may unintentiionally overstate or inaccurately report their reactions. Just something to think about.

Patient experiences are really valuable but it is a good idea to read a range of them, not just one or two. Does this make sense?

As for being a high maintenance patient, you have that right. It is your life, and your quality of life. We all have to be advocates for ourselves in this healthcare environment that we are living in. You have a right to cross every t and dot every i. After all, you will be living with the results, emphasis on living.

I hope others are tuning into our discussion, to experience your perspective and your positive attitude!

Take care,

Gary

jayabee52
jayabee52 2011-01-05 15:32:14 -0600 Report

I have been tracking this discussion and following what has been said here even though I might not post often.

As far as being a high maintenance patient, my bride "Jem" was certainly one of those. And she had gathered a terrific medical support team (before I knew her).

She had minor problems with some of the Drs, but was generally well loved by the majority of her medical team. In fact the very afternoon of the day she passed I received a personal call from her gastro Doc saying that of all his patients, she was his favorite, because she made an effort to get to know each individual on her team and inquired about them and their spouses & children, and would share a joke or two with them, even when she was hurting. Even though I was not receiving monetary payment I felt I was on her treatment team as I was with her every day, reading her meter, drawing up her insulin injections, & reporting BG#s & injections to her Endo & DM care team twice a week and attending all her appointments with her. And she had such a positive attitude, sometimes I felt as if she was being a "Pollyanna".

I feel glad that she let me into her life (she had good reason to close herself off after being repeatedly abandoned by fiancees earlier), even though we were together only about 15 mos prior to her passing.

I remain interested and plan to follow this discussion as long as it is active.

Blessings to all

James

Dr Gary
Dr GaryCA 2011-01-05 16:52:17 -0600 Report

HI James,

Thanks for jumping in here! This is a beautiful story, and a testimony to the importance of being an involved patient. Jem obviously developed relationships with her treatment team that was based on mutual respect and collegiality -- she expected to receive, but she also gave of herself in the best way that she could, by showing personal interest and concern. Clearly, that was appreciated and remembered.

I really appreciate this, and am sure others will as well.

jayabee52
jayabee52 2011-01-06 10:49:55 -0600 Report

Yes Jem was certainly collegial, She had earned a LCSW in CA, hard enough for a sighted person, but she had been blind since 14. (Long before she had DM). A lot of the credit for her survival and thriving before I came on the scene belongs to her Mother "O". When I was in Jem's life solidly she succumbed to the ravages of Non Hodgkins lymphoma. Jem lived with O all her life until O's passing in Nov '08.

Before she passed, we had a little show wedding ceremony for O since Jem had never been married. O had been non responsive for 2 days and the home hospice RN said it wouldn't be long till she passed. Jem called her brother & family & close friends and a chaplain friend to come. We held the ceremony in O's bedroom with family & friends gathered around. Sometime during the ceremony O opened her eyes and smiled. She passed the very next day. I believe she was happy to see Jem had someone who cared for Jem almost as much as she did. (Nothing can beat a mother's love)

Dr Gary
Dr GaryCA 2011-01-06 23:26:03 -0600 Report

Hi James,

What an inspiration Jem must have been to everyone she came into contact with. You're right, earning an LCSW is no easy task, and for a blind person, that is an incredible accomplishment.

What a beautiful story. It says a lot for your wife, but also for you, that you would want to do this for her mother. That's really wonderful. And I am sure her mother must have felt a great sense of peace knowing that her daughter was loved and watched over, something that every parent wants for their children.

I reallly appreciate this!

And have a great weekend!

ufgatorfan92
ufgatorfan92 2011-01-04 14:02:04 -0600 Report

Gary~

I completely agree with your post. I would NEVER look to another diabetic for medical advice, however, real life experiences are way more believable from one who has lived it as opposed to a medical professional who may be FACTUALLY accurate but has never experienced ANY effects of diabetes FIRST HAND. Remember, I am the first one to say that a GREAT team of DOCTORS is ESSENTIAL for any diabetic!! I would have NEVER been able to get to where I am at now without a TON of support teams in place…including FAMILY, FRIENDS, GREAT DOCTORS, and GOD!!

Once again, I do think you are a HUGE help to everyone who takes the time to read your posts. It is good to have both patients and professionals here at DC.

It is always GREAT to chat with you Gary. I hope ALL is well with you and look forward to chatting soon! Take care!

God Bless~
In Christ~

Scott
Weston, Florida

Dr Gary
Dr GaryCA 2011-01-05 17:03:37 -0600 Report

Hey Scott,

And I agree with you. Collecting a whole body of knowledge is really important, and this includes both the information, expertise, and experiences of medical professionals, but also extensive input from patients. And you're right, no one can possibly understand what a patient is going through, even if you spend a lot of time treating them and talking to them. Professionals still aren't living their bodies.

Awhile back, I was meeting with a client going through extensive chemotherapy. She was telling me what her last week had been like, with fatigue, difficulty eating, depression, etc.

Being Mr. Empathy, I said, "I can imagine."

She answered, "No Gary. You can't imagine. Not if you haven't been through this."

My foot definitely went into my mouth where it belonged.

But I do worry sometimes that patients are not taking the time to get this balance of information. They may meet another patient on a discussion board and suddenly be ready to run to a totally new treatment program that may or may not be the best for their specific condition yet, in their impatience to "just get on with it" they are ready to run into the arms of a provider with a promise. I call this being in Flight reaction.

Clearly, this doesn't apply to you in any way. Having a balanced, but thorough, information base is best.

I just wish I could find more ways to work with patients to get them through this process better, so that they could indeed be making the wisest choices possible. Getting to the best treatment takes a lot of work, a lot of bravery, a lot of patience, a lot of emotional support, a lot of faith.

Hope you had a good day,

Gary

ufgatorfan92
ufgatorfan92 2011-01-06 07:39:22 -0600 Report

Gary~

Once again I find your post to be "right on!" I have been one to play the role of "Mr. Empathy" in situations I could never begin to understand also. I think that may be human nature. You always want to be able to be a good listener and a "shoulder" whenever possible, but there are occassions when you just can't know what the one you are trying to comfort is experiencing. I don't think there is any reason to feel bad for that. I believe later on, once the individual has moved passed that dilemna, they often look back and appreciate the empathy you have extended.

I am surely no expert at that, and it seems as though you have way more experiences in that area. As you mentioned, being part of a solid and encouraging, yet educating healthcare team, is ESSENTIAL to the success of any patient. I love ALL my DOCTORS!!

I believe the role JAMES played as the primary caregiver to Jem, can be one of the GREATEST support tools a patient can have in their corner. I am certainly not minimizing the importance of doctors, family, and friends, but the primary caregiver's role can be as challenging as the patient's role if not more so. I don't know how I would have made it all these years without my wife. She would rush home from work during my hypoglycemic blackouts, call EMS at 2am when I was experiencing hypoglycemic unawareness, attend every peritoneal dialysis training class with me, and slept by my side every night I was in the hospital no matter what the reason. Thank God for those we know and love who take on such responsibilities…WHAT ANGELS!!

On a slightly different note, I have been checking my blood glucose MORE now that I am not a diabetic than when I was…ironic huh? I also am even more careful of what I put in my mouth than ever before. I guess I am still getting used to the fact that my pancreas is working, and so afraid to see a glucose reading above 200 again! I still concentrate on BG levels, but I am so obsessive, I made graphs charting my lab numbers from week to week…my post transplant coordinator thought it was "crazy." I am charting AMYLASE, LIPASE, POTASSIUM, PHOSPHORUS, WBC, RBC, HEMATOCRIT, and even CREATININE, just to name a few. Once you educate me on what is important, I seem to go off the deep end. Oh well.

Thanks again for ALL the responses to my initial post and subsequent responses. I wish I had more time to post. I have so many similar experiences on so many of the other postings, I just don't have that much computer time alotted in my day. MY APOLOGIES!! I will try better…I promise.

Take GREAT care!
God Bless~
In Christ~

Scott
Weston, Florida

P.S: Since transplant 72 days ago, my highest blood glucose reading has been 107!! What a MIRACLE!!

Dr Gary
Dr GaryCA 2011-01-06 23:18:51 -0600 Report

HI Scott,

Thanks for your kind words, as always. What I have learned from my work is that we all suffer, maybe in different ways, but the experience of being challenged by life's circumstances, and everything that goes along with that, is something that we all share. That, as you said, is what leads to being able to feel empathy for someone else. We are all in this together!

Nice to hear that you have a wfe and that she has been such a willing partner throughout your journey. That is something that I wish for everyone who is facing a health crisis.

And as for being so obsessive about your numbers, that just seems like being an empowered patient to me. I suspect your doctors must appreciate your involvement. It makes their job easer.

You are a popular guy, because you are an inspiration! Always nice to connect whenever you have time.

Have a great weekend!

Gary

kathy7
kathy7 2011-01-06 09:18:56 -0600 Report

Hi Scott,
What a fantastic story. I can relate to so much of what you are saying here. I had an islet cell transplant 2 1/2 years ago and it has transformed my life as well. I had 2 years with no insulin and now use 8 units and am very well under control. I feel so lucky and grateful for this opportunity. I have become an advocate for organ donation as well. The other thing that I found interesting is that like you, I am more careful about what I do an eat now. I was very careful before too, but I never got any positive feedback from my body. My BGs never reacted to the things that I tried. Now I can tell how much the exercise and lower carb meals help. Its just amazing.

all the best to you,

Kathy

ufgatorfan92
ufgatorfan92 2011-01-06 09:38:48 -0600 Report

Hey Kathy~

I remember when I was younger and the doctors were talking about islet cell transplantation. I don't think I have ever met or spoke with an actual recipient until I read your post. What a FANTASTIC STORY!!
It is so funny how you feel more cautious now than you did prior, and trust me all the diabetics that I know are extremely cautious, especially with their diet. I check my blood sugar close to 6 times a day now and I am so very very cautious of what I put in my mouth. Like you said, I was very strict before, but now I feel like I have been given a second chance. Now that I know more, I want to take care of my new organs.

I guess, for me, the GREATEST thing about the transplant, and there are a million GREAT things, is my friends and family no longer have to worry about my hypoglycemic blackouts. I know statistically, most diabetics have one hypoglycemic unawareness episode a year. I was having them as much as four or five times a month…YIKES!!

Enough about me. I am so glad you posted. It is so ENCOURAGING to hear your story, especially since most diabetics are more likely to have an islet cell transplant than a double organ transplant. I mean, I had to get really sick in order to get better.

Continue the GREAT work Kathy!! God is GREAT! The CURE is just around the corner…I feel it!!

God Bless~
In Christ~

Scott
Weston, Florida

Graylin Bee
Graylin Bee 2011-01-01 17:35:17 -0600 Report

Yes miracles do happen. They have happened to me pesonally, through healing. I have always said yes to the donor idea. There are so many people who have benefitted from the gift of life. Glad that you are the recipient of God's Grace.

ufgatorfan92
ufgatorfan92 2011-01-02 07:01:21 -0600 Report

Graylin Bee~

I so appreciate the kind words and support. I do believe we will see a cure for diabetes in our lifetime and not just alternate ways of treating diabetes, like transplantation. I find it so ironic that so many diabetics that I know are organ donors, and most of us were donors long before we were ever directly effected by such a cause…that is God at work for sure!

Thanks again for all your encouraging thoughts. I am glad to see you are a product of God's healing as well. I can't wait for the day I sign on this site, and ALL the posts are like mine.

God is GREAT and we need to remember He works on his time not ours.

God Bless~
In christ~

Scott
Weston, Florida

MewElla
MewElla 2010-12-31 07:37:01 -0600 Report

What a courageous man you are…Congratulations on a brand new life.

ufgatorfan92
ufgatorfan92 2010-12-31 07:49:55 -0600 Report

MewElla~

Thanks for the kind words. We are all very special in our own right. Diabetes is a terrible disease, but many of us are blessed to be surrounded by GREAT friends and GREAT family, and are under the care of INCREDIBLE doctors!!

Diabetes will always be a part of my life, regardless. I am so very very grateful for this second lease on life.

Take GREAT care!! If there is anything I can help you with, just drop a line.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!
God Bless~

Scott
Weston, Florida

jayabee52
jayabee52 2010-12-30 17:46:52 -0600 Report

Your story is very encouraging.

I am 58, a t2, and my kidneys shut down because of infection in Nov 2006. I was on hemodialysis for about 10 months, then miraculously my kidneys started working well enough to stop dialysis, even though function is not 100%. I met a lady online in Nov 2007, and eventually moved to & married her. When we first met she was on PD, like you, but couldn't continue due to allergy to the PD catheter so she was put on hemodialysis. She also had CHF & COPD and was a candidate for heart, lung & kidney transplant. Unfortunately she had Lupis (SLE) and wasn't eligible for transplantation. She died too soon July 2010 @ age 56.

i may need a kidney eventually, because my tests show I've lost kidney function this past Nov. But I am not quite at the point I'll need dialysis - yet.

I have had organ donor on my Driver's license for quite some time. I don't know if there are any organs such as heart or liver which can be used, but I have instructed my sons that if any of my organs are usable, give permission to harvest them.

I also would like to take this opportunity to advocate for blood donation. I started donating when I was 16 and tried to give every time I was allowed. I've lost track of how many gallons of blood I've donated. I think maybe somewhere between 20 & 30.

Unfortunately I no longer can donate blood because of my multiple medical challenges and the cocktall of drugs I must use in an attempt to control them. But I urge everyone who can, please do so!

I got 6 units of blood back in Nov 2010 when I was hospitalized for a bleeding ulcer. Had that blood not been available, well, I'd rather not think about it.

If you haven't given blood in a while, and you are able, take an hour out of your day and donate blood, and do it whenever you can. I always felt better physically, and also felt better about myself after I donated.

Blessings to you and yours in 2011

James

ufgatorfan92
ufgatorfan92 2010-12-30 21:19:31 -0600 Report

James~

The life of a diabetic, whether Type I or Type II, can be difficult. First let me say I am so very very sorry to hear about your wife. My wife has been my rock when I wasn't able to be strong on my own.

As you already know, PD is not for everyone. I live a very active lifestyle, being a mail carrier, and ironically, the 6 1/2 + miles of walking I do daily, has definitely been a HUGE factor in why I have been able to fight of the complications of diabetes for so long. However, I never even considered HEMO for a second. Look, PD is no better or no worse than HEMO, but for me, unless I was FORCED to the Kidney Center 3 times a week, I was not interested in that route at all. Not to mention, I was head strong about continuing to work as I did prior to my renal failure. At one point, I was delivering the mail 8 hours a day with less than 8% kidney functioning because I was fighting the dialysis idea period!

I have been very fortunate to have a GREAT team of doctors in place here in South Florida for most of my diabetic life, and was UNBELIEVABLY blessed to have found The Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville to help completely change my life. Actually, my wife found The Mayo Clinic during an online search after we had all kinds of issues getting listed on the organ transplant list here in Miami. What a bleesing in disguise.

I wish I had a bunch of words of wisdom to relay to you, unfortunately all I have are real life experiences. I am sure you hear it all the time to be strong and never give up…but I found a POSITIVE state of mind (whenever possible) and a strong belief in Christ go a long long way!!

If there is anything I can do to help with any of your concerns, please do not hesitate to write to me. I will pray for you daily.

By the way, I also enrolled as an organ donor back when I turned 16, never realizing the ramifications of my decision. Life can be filled with lots of irony, or what I like to call God Directives.

Thanks for responding to my posting. I will continue to keep you inprayer and I wish you the best of luck. Prayers ARE answered EVERYDAY. I know this first hand!!

God Bless you and your family~
Happy New Year my brother~

Scott
Weston, Florida

jayabee52
jayabee52 2010-12-31 03:59:05 -0600 Report

Thank you for your comforting words Scott! I knew that my relationship might be short when getting involved with Jem, but had hoped we would have more time together because it was such a wonderful and emotionally healing relationship for both of us. We had each had our own physical and emotional struggles when younger. She knew just what I needed emotionally, and I seemed to know just what to say to help her heal her emotional hurts too. We could see God's hand at work putting us together. We were both strong believers in Christ. I know I will see and be with her again, but it is a mixed blessing that I am now separated from her. I am happy that she is no longer afflicted by the pains she endured because of her medical challenges. I am sad for myself that I no longer am able to hug her and be hugged.

I will be praying for you every day as well. I know He has a purpose for me still - because I'm still breathing. I will be praying that you find a kidney soon.

I just got a call tonight that the apartment I had been hoping for opened up. I just pray that I can make it through their screening process, and be accepted as a resident.

Blessings to you and yours, brother Scott! I am sure we'll be in touch.

James Baker
Las Vegas NV

ufgatorfan92
ufgatorfan92 2010-12-31 07:19:20 -0600 Report

James~

Sorry it has taken me a little bit to get back with you. I am still learning how to navigate this site. It was great to hear from you again James. I know it sounds cliche, but I too believe everything happens for a reason, and yes I too feel God has kept me here on this earth for a very very IMPORTANT reason.

After receiving the kidney-pancreas transplant almost 67 days ago…it re-affirms my faith and trust that God is GREAT and we all are put through trials to learn how to accept what God is about to do in our lives. I have a personality type that wants things on my schedule, which was difficult when waiting for my transplant. I heard stories of individuals getting transplanted in several months, and yet I waited 693 days. I always remembered this…

God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change,
the courage to change the things I can, and
the wisdom to know the difference.

I hung that in my dialysis room on a GIANT banner and used it as a motivating tool daily!!

I BELIEVE you have a calling and a plan here on this earth. Sharing your story here on this site is, in itself, the hand of God at work. And I too believe your wife is watching over you and waiting for your TRIUMPHANT arrival in heaven to spend eternity with her in BRAND NEW BODIES, not afflicted with any disease or complications.

Sorry if you think I am being overly preachy…I just know the power and grace of God, and even when I was really sick, I could still find the Lord's grace and comfort.

Have a HAPPY NEW YEAR once again James. I will be praying for you brother.
Try not to partake in too many snacks…hehehehe.

Hope to hear from you real soon~
Brothers In Christ~

Scott
Weston, Florida

PS: I don't know too many things of this world, but I DO KNOW your apartment will work out for you. Take GREAT care!!

MAYS
MAYS 2010-12-30 16:25:05 -0600 Report

Welcome to Family!
~Mays~

ufgatorfan92
ufgatorfan92 2010-12-31 07:22:38 -0600 Report

Mays~

Thanks!! Glad to be part of the SUGAR family so to speak. I look forward to sharing my stories with y'all as well as learning from your experiences.

HAPPY NEW YEAR!!

In Christ~

Scott
Weston, Florida

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