Celiac Disease and Type I Share Common Genes

Emma2412
By Emma2412 Latest Reply 2010-05-31 10:29:17 -0500
Started 2010-05-31 10:29:17 -0500

In my search for other information concerning Celiac Disease and Diabetes, I found the following at:

http://www.celiac.com/articles/21716/1/Celiac...

"Celiac Disease and Type 1 Diabetes Share Common Genes
Celiac.com 12/12/2008 - For some time now scientists have been working to better understand the connection between celiac disease and diabetes.

"About 10% of children and 2% of adults with Type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease, as compared to just 1% of the general population. Moreover, celiac disease and diabetes are known to have a common genetic susceptibility locus in the HLA system, specifically, HLA class II alleles on chromosome six.

"The primary susceptibility genes for type-1 diabetes are HLA-DQB1 and HLA-DRB1, but they act in combination with non-immune system genes as well as environmental factors that are still undiscovered. Celiac disease also has a major susceptibility gene in the HLA system — HLA-DQB1 — as well as locations outside the HLA complex.

"Recently, a research team led by John Todd, Ph.D., of the University of Cambridge, set out to better understand the connection between the two diseases, and to determine if they shared any non-HLA regions. They discovered another seven regions outside of the HLA system that are tied to both celiac disease and diabetes.

"One of those regions is the 32-base pair insertion-deletion variant on chromosome three that leads to a non-functional CCR5 receptor on T cells. People who carry both pairs of these genes enjoy some protection against HIV infection, and its role in both celiac disease and diabetes indicates that lymphocytes are a key factor in both diseases. Carriers of these genes also face a greater risk of developing either celiac disease or diabetes, or both conditions in their lifetimes.

"In genome-wide association studies, eight loci outside the HLA system have been associated with celiac disease. Similarly, 15 non-HLA loci have been linked with Type 1 diabetes.

"Dr. Todd and colleagues genotyped single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)—single letter variations in the genetic code—in the eight celiac loci and in the 15 diabetes loci.

"They then screened DNA samples from 9,339 control subjects, 2,560 subjects with celiac disease, and 8,064 subjects with diabetes. They also tested the diabetic children, along with both biological parents in 2,828 families. The overall statistical significance was P


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