FALSE ADVERTISING ON DAILY ALTERNATE SITE TESTING FOR SUGAR

Bob in Stephens City
By Bob in Stephens City Latest Reply 2008-08-30 05:56:38 -0500
Started 2008-07-12 05:57:18 -0500

American Diabetic and most diabetic doctors do not recommend that diabetics use alternate sites on body other than fingers for sugar testing at beginning of a meal or when you suspect or feel high or low sugar. THIS new advertising states they have a new meter that eliminates use of your fingers. THIS IS A HOAX AND SHOULD BE REMOVED or reported to better business bureau. This confuses senior citizens and new diabetics that fingers no longer used. Call these advertisers and tell them the advertising is erroneous. I did.

Tags: devices

13 replies

Charish
Charish 2008-08-30 05:56:38 -0500 Report

Using the fingers has always been my choice and I really don't think changing now will make a difference. My meter, the Free Style Lite, uses an smaller amount of blood for testing and I have found that it's a very small margin between my Free Style and The One Touch I once used. Even though I do love the One Touch. So I don't think that jumping around from site to site will make a big difference. The important thing is that you get an accurate read regardless.

Charish

tmana
tmana 2008-08-30 05:35:05 -0500 Report

Alternate site testing is considered to lag behind fingertip testing because fingers are used frequently and have a "fresher" supply of blood.

Personally, I have poor peripheral circulation in my hands, so my forearm is usually a much more accurate test site than my fingertip — however, I find much greater variation between several brands of meters using a side-by-side forearm test than using a side-by-side fingertip test.

As far as sample size, the Ultra has a large sample size at 1 microliter. Greater sample size generally does not improve accuracy, as the difficulty in obtaining that sample size can cause strips to be wasted, and multiple-squeeze fills can throw off the meter's accuracy. That being said, most of the sample sizes are small enough/large enough that a typical lancet prick will draw enough blood for any one of them.

As far as handling the individual strips are concerned (Ryan's issue), a cartridge-fill system might be a better choice. Try either the Bayer Breeze or the Accu-Chek Compact. The Breeze uses a ten-strip disk; the Compact, a 17-strip drum. You can get the Accu-Chek free directly from their Web site; you can get the Breeze free if you sign up and get your physician to write you a new script for the meter and strip cartridges.

rubo
rubo 2008-08-03 08:58:03 -0500 Report

i have complaint, where ever i can think of, but so far nobody listen. one touch ultra has changed the test strips and now it takes 3 times as much blood. the test strips are imported from uk. i have the proof of the change.after hr. on the phone, and email they agreed about the change, but the they say it takes less blood, and there every thing stops.

yours rudolf

Gabby
GabbyPA 2008-08-03 12:43:46 -0500 Report

I have seen your posts in several other discussions and I really don't get why it is a big deal? A larger sample is more accurate...so if you don't want to use a larger sample, use a different meter. Am I just missing the point?

morris.js
morris.js 2008-08-03 14:50:43 -0500 Report

Your absolutely right Gabby! like I answered in his other post, I just got my order for the one touch refilled and they are the same as they have been, and the pharmacist just got them from his supplier…so I see no change anyway.

liz2857
liz2857 2008-08-03 15:32:10 -0500 Report

I haven't seen any difference in my test strips either,I still don't get what the big deal is all about? (((hugs)))Liz

Bob in Stephens City
Bob in Stephens City 2008-08-30 04:10:27 -0500 Report

I AGREE, TRY TO GET THE NEW ACCU-CHEK AVIVA. ALL NEW PROCESS. ONLY THING I DONT LIKE IS HANDLING THE STRIPS. HOPE THEY DELETE THAT SOON WITH NEW PROCESS.

Gabby
GabbyPA 2008-07-13 11:04:41 -0500 Report

I always test on my fingers, but why are the fingers better than anywhere else? What makes the blood different in other parts of my body?

morris.js
morris.js 2008-07-13 05:15:38 -0500 Report

All the meters I have say you can use alternate sites, but they also warn not to use these results as a true basis for insulin injections, or for treating highs or lows. They tell you to always use the fingers if you suspect anything unusual taking place.
John

Bob in Stephens City
Bob in Stephens City 2008-08-30 04:08:20 -0500 Report

Thanks John, that is point i am trying to get across You can use alternate site
testing but fingers is still the place
for accuracy. I just received my free ACCU-CHEK AVIVA tester and best device
out there I think. New needle is great and hardly feel it.

DiabetesDiva
DiabetesDiva 2008-07-12 06:17:05 -0500 Report

My experience with my educator, doctor and nutritionist have told me it's ok to test on other sites. I've never tested except on my fingers, so I can't say if the readings are accurate on other sites. My new (free) AccuCheck Compact Plus came with an alternate lancet head to test on other sites.

Kate

Bob in Stephens City
Bob in Stephens City 2008-07-13 03:17:27 -0500 Report

KATE I have same meter and have used the device for alternate site testing and it is around 10 or 15 difference. American Diabetic Association has good guidance on their webside for alternate site testing.

DiabetesDiva
DiabetesDiva 2008-07-13 05:21:52 -0500 Report

BOB: Thanks so much for the info. After just a year, I'm still learning. I'll check out the ADA. I'm too frightened to test anywhere but my fingers.

Kate

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