Military and Diabetes

Frustrated mom
By Frustrated mom Latest Reply 2014-08-31 07:10:44 -0500
Started 2009-09-23 13:44:06 -0500

Does anyone know if there is a branch in the Military that a diabetic can join? My son would love to join the Military like his older brother, but has found out that he can not join the Army or Airforce.. What about the Navy? If anyone has an answer please let me know…He is T1…Thank you!


53 replies

Kooper14
Kooper14 2014-08-29 23:39:35 -0500 Report

A diabetic can join the coast guard auxiliary it's no pay but at least u get a uniform and a role in the military

Gabby
GabbyPA 2014-08-31 07:10:44 -0500 Report

This is good to know. I know people want to serve the country in anyway they can. This is a good option. Thank you.

macster111
macster111 2014-08-14 15:33:18 -0500 Report

hey everyone I'm t1 and I'm reading all these things about being a liability on the front lines and having another solider having to help you and risking more lives, but i would like to join the navy as a chef so I wouldn't be near the front front lines… so would i be able to join the navy as a chef with t1 or is it still a big no no

Gabby
GabbyPA 2014-08-16 05:40:44 -0500 Report

I don't know for sure on that. Even a chef has to go through the basic training. I would ask a recruiting office about that.

Jford232
Jford232 2014-07-13 01:14:40 -0500 Report

I think anyone with t1d or t2d should be able to be in the army but the army or military doesn't want to be responsible for you forgetting to do your insulin and then if you do that they not only don't want you shot dead they don't want you diabetic ally dead but then again you can at least give people a chance to try out if you can't try out than what's the point of letting people with other health defects, but hey I was diagnosed march 13 2013 so I only am about 1 year in

BOOLZEYE
BOOLZEYE 2014-06-06 12:16:42 -0500 Report

In 2002 I I took the ASVAB in my high school junior year, I came out with the highest test score in my entire school. The following months I was hassled by phone calls from recruiters from every department trying to recruit me to their branch. I was always interested to enlist with the USMC yet denied for type 1 diabetes. I totally agree with the statements below that I am physically unable to march mile after mile or withstand the desert heat and may become a liability due to lack of insulin or food. I never once was asked what job I was interested in when all I wanted was to become a computer engineer. This does not require extreme physical conditioning or risking anyone else's life. Yet the Denial was the same DIABETIC your like the plague. So here we are 12 years later I currently work as a medical biller with a computer technician certification I can use for toilet paper as ATI ITT and all those killed the demand. My computer engineering dreams crashed once I realized I could not afford to live sustain myself & push thru years of school financially and physically devote to a full time job & schooling. We have a "disability" yet I have applied for "disability" 3 times but I am not dead so I don't qualify. Even though a couple years ago I was in ICU 7 times in 6 months due to insulin was being regulated and I tend to develop a resistance or adaptation to the insulin. I work 25% of the time sick because since I don't qualify for disability I have to work sick or go homeless. My dad went as far as taking me to 2 congressmen (Lincoln Diaz-Balart , Ileana Ross) and they stated nothing can be done. We need a Diabetic reform. If we Can not have the same opportunities in the system we need the same handicaps to survive it.

My name is Omar Anthony Ruiz from Pompano Beach, Florida

Viceroy68
Viceroy68 2014-05-28 00:05:35 -0500 Report

i was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when i was 7 years old. i am now 15. ive wanted to join since i was 2 years old. I have gotten my a1c down to 6.1. I understand the liabilities us diabetics present, but i do not believe that we shouldnt be allowed into the military. i am the healthiest person you will ever meet, im perfect weight and im in sports. i have played 12 different sports and have never been unconcious do to a low or high bloodsugar. I believe that we should be able to go through basic military training with only our long lasting insulin. No fast acting. We should be able to take it every 12 or 24 hours, depending on your schedule of delivery. i take my long lasting every 12 hours. I believe that if we pass BMT with only this accomidation we should be allowed to be in the military. I understand that i am young, and have a lot of growing up to do but my opinion should still matter. i believe that we should be given a chance. if we cant make it then we dont deserve to be in the military. that is the point of BMT, its a test, and like every test, if we pass we pass, if we dont we dont. We atleast deserve a chance, im not a radical person. i wont go crazy and protest. but i am a realist. i believe we should be given a chance. And i will do everything i can to join the military. if i am rejected i am rejected, but Frustrated Mom tell your son to never give up, everyone says if you set your mind to something you can do it. So i guess we should prove them right or wrong. The one who tries and fails earns more respect than the one who never tried at all. I wish your son the best of luck and God bless yall :)

Anonymous
Anonymous 2014-05-21 19:47:30 -0500 Report

I was an infantry officer in the Marine Corps and was diagnosed T1 while on my second deployment and later medically retired. I do not believe T1′s should be allowed to enter the military or remain in the military for that matter. It is challenging enough to control this disease in a controlled enviroment(ie: being a civilian). The stress of any type of deployment for any MOS exposes service members to uncontrolled environments that potentially put the diabetic in a situation of “sugar vulnerability” thus putting his/her fellow service members at risk while changing a mission from the task at hand to the diabetic and their sugar issue. Also to be “in” the military but not deploy as a diabetic means you take a slot of non deployability permenatly away from healthy service members who may end up deploying twice because the diabetic can not deploy, that means time away from their family and inherant risks all because the T1 with their known condition stays in. The military is about evaluating and mitigating risks and ultimately us T1′s are a risk that can be avoided. I would not want my Marines to be at potential risk and have to be taken away from a mission to attend to me on a low BGL and potentially get killed when it could have been avoided by me not participating. We are a risk and should not be in an occupation which requires that a it’s amount of detail to ensure the safety of other service members. The comparison of professional athletes is not even compatible, a pro athlete with T1 has a dedicated medical staffer solely to monitor that athlete and is always in a controlled environment under constant supervision. On the battlefield or on a long convoy in the middle of Northern Africa…. That is not the case. That’s my perspective as a former military officer and T1 and to me it is selfish to remain in the military with T1 as you put others at risk and/or take away time if you are in a non-deployable from others who have to deploy twice in your place.

Jazzyiphone
Jazzyiphone 2014-03-11 14:29:07 -0500 Report

Unfortunately like asthma, it's an automatic disqualification. If it were diagnosed while already in service that would be different.
I know it sucks :(

NickF
NickF 2014-03-11 01:05:59 -0500 Report

Why do people ignore(or some word) others? That one person with diabetes or some other disease might be the one to win the war

jayabee52
jayabee52 2014-03-11 05:38:20 -0500 Report

or more likely, Nick, the person with diabetes has a low and passes out and requires at least another soldier to look after him and get him to safety, In that way that soldier with diabetes could be responsible for losing the battle and perhaps the war.

Or do we want to leave the soldier with the low to fend for himself where he falls and not be cared for by his fellow soldiers? That would not be the military that I grew up believing in.

svatko12
svatko12 2014-02-07 11:59:59 -0600 Report

hi my name is josh svatko I am a type one diabetic. sadly no one wants a diabetic in the front lines. that's just dumb. sorry to break your dream's. but martin luther king jr had a dream that all people would be treated equaly. well as a diabetic I am willing to fight even if its a desk job I take it winning a war is not all guns and front lines but also support to. I willing to bet if we all stand up together and say something whether its write the president congress or the supreme court. we can make something happen. diabetes should not stop ones dreams but only provide a stepping stone. we once said man cant go to the moon and we proved it wroung I am willing to take action and do something."We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness." we as a people are being denied are writes to join and serve are country. all men are created equal and must be given the same chance. if any one agrees messege me and let are messeg be herd. flow me on twitter or face book I will be writing the supream court and the president as well as congress men.

Trudie Ann
Trudie Ann 2014-04-01 12:09:43 -0300 Report

Hay, svatko12 run for congress and use diabetics who want to serve as your compaign slogan. It wouldn't hurt to try. I am sure there are more diabetics who would like to serve, and I know there are those of us who served and are now diabetics that would be sympathetic, and support you. Especially if it was a desk job, we did have a president that had polio, and he did a pretty good job too.

Gabby
GabbyPA 2014-04-01 09:16:45 -0500 Report

I was speaking with a retired army soldier yesterday and she told me that even previously broken bones will keep you out. They just need to make sure that the soldiers are in top shape to be able to fight. Physically and mentally. And even with those strict guidelines, some get in who shouldn't and have caused great loss of life either by accident or on purpose.

My husband wanted to be in the Navy, following in his family tradition, but he is in a wheelchair. Would it be any more right for him to serve or anyone with a chronic condition? I would not want a mentally ill person in the fox hole with me. There are too many "what if's" that surround that issue. I could not really expect a blind person to hit their target or a deaf person to hear someone sneak up on them. If someone has a heart condition, would I have to carry them through a mission march? In the same light, if you don't have your insulin or can't eat to prevent a low or have something to get you out of one, how can you be depended on to preform your duties? It is the loss of two soldiers in that case, as you will need one to aid you.

I think we confuse equal with same. We can be equals, but we don't have to be the same. If we all did the same things, there would be no diversity. Even just the basic make up of a family or society demonstrates that. Not all can be business owners or garbage men. If we all were moms what would life be like? I know that seems very elementary, but its the way it really is.

If you have a desire to serve the country, there are many, many ways to do that. The military may just not be accessible for you. When one door is closed, find the open one instead of banging your head on the closed one.

dwadavis
dwadavis 2014-03-31 12:04:30 -0300 Report

Hey Josh, I'm Dwayne and I have already wrote the president about the same issue you brought up in your long response. I'm also type I diabetic, and go through the same, constant battles of dealing with our government holding us back from achieving our dreams and pursuit of happiness. I mentioned pretty much those same arguments to the president and he actually emailed me back believe it or not! Or at least it was signed: Barrack Obama. The president simply went on and on how he was trying to help all Americans with problems and how he and his administration is working so hard to try and make this country and the entire world a better place to live. But, lets be clear about something: everyone will never be equal as long as the government puts limits on our ability simply because our pancreas can't make insulin anymore. Our disease holds us back from serving our country and from many jobs like truck driving, flying airplanes, driving a bus, and of course joining the Air Force, Navy, Army, National Reserve, etc. The Gov. does not care about you: Obama said: "we have free eye exams for you." Yeah, and that's true. But we all simply just want to be equal like everyone else and have the chance to do what we want to do in life and not let the government hold us back. Do we not pay the same amount of taxes as those who are not afflicted with type I or II diabetes? Yes, we are all vulnerable to high taxes both state and federal like "normal" Americans, but we are taxed without real representation b/c we are limited. I can go on and on Josh, but I'm with u.

jayabee52
jayabee52 2014-04-01 14:44:45 -0500 Report

Howdy Dwane
I really don't follow the thought ". . . we are taxed without real representation b/c we are limited" Do you mean that you don't have a congressional representative for whom you are able to vote (whether or not you do vote - you have the opportunity)?

There are certain things that various people are unable to do. Do you want a blind man driving the bus you are on? I would not. It wouldn't be safe for me or the bus driver or anyone on the bus or even nearby. (I am not predjuced against blind people for my 2nd wife, now disceased, was totally blind). Because we have physical or even mental difficulties does not
make us disabled, it makes us "differently enabled", and while we may not be able to do what we would want to do, we can play a part in the larger scheme of things. You may not be able to fight in a war, but you could join the USO and help the troops with their morale. The reasons a T1 (or even a T2) could not serve in the armed forces is listed on other places on this discussion, and won't be listed here. But seek out ways in which you CAN support the men and women who serve our nation for our defense.

God's best to you and yours

James Baker

dwadavis
dwadavis 2014-04-02 08:41:01 -0500 Report

Hey James, thanks for responding to my post and offering your opinion on it. I have to say you made some really valid points in both posts that I read from you. The statement that I made about being taxed without being represented was my way of saying the government still expects us to pay the same high taxes and produce the same amount of revenue for government spending, but then they limit what we can do. If a person is hindered from working certain jobs or joining certain organizations that can give him/her a jump start in life I think he/she should not be required to pay the same amount as a person who can participate in the Navy or Army in order to help pay for college, get a nice car, and get a great start on life. For what its worth: its like they throw diabetics on an island and say make us some revenue but you can't do this, this, oh and this. But you can dig a ditch.

When it comes to blind people they have a well documented disadvantage in life and I feel for them, but since you brought up the blind we have to look deeper into what they get for a comparison to diabetics. There is a way the blind can save on their taxes because the government gives the blind a tax credit because of their disability. I'm all for the blind getting their disability tax credit, but are diabetics not disabled also because the government does not allow us to drive a bus or plane as if we were blinded as well? And that also goes hand in hand with being taxed without real representation: if we were really represented, would we not also get a tax credit due to our disadvantage like the blind and deaf? There isn't any programs available to help diabetics: the blind get help finding jobs so they can remain independent in life, and its a great program b/c most real adults do not want to be dependent on others. But what does a type I diabetic get when he/she tries to take on the world as an adult: a free eye exam as mentioned by President Barrack Obama.

For what its worth: do we really want the guy who has low blood sugar on the battlefield or in the driver seat of a bus in ICU when a patient is about to die on the emergency room table? If the government and society is going to put the worse case scenario in a situation to hinder and limit a diabetic's quality of life we should add it to everything because every person makes decisions in life. The truck driver who gets high and cause a major accident, or the pilot who gets more drunker than a Georgia Southern freshman and crashes a plane make the negative decision in life to get drunk and high. Therefore, a diabetic may take too much insulin and his or her sugar might get too low while driving the mail truck for the post office; sugar might get too low while driving a powered lift at Lowes and run over a two customers; sugar might get too low at Pizza Hut and burn the whole building down and kill six other employees; sugar might get too low while working for FedEx and run the FedEx truck into a school bus killing the driver and six students; sugar might get too low while bathing an infant in the infant center at a local hospital and the baby drowns.

I'm Dwayne Davis

Ilovemel09
Ilovemel09 2014-02-14 15:04:48 -0400 Report

I'll join u my daughter apply for the marines and the navy and the marines just denied her she Ben working hard in school and collage at the same time in nursing. She goes to HS for her diploma and going to college for nursing at the same time do to her gift of knowledge she will graduate a head of time with two graduation her HS and college as well in the state of PA. I know how hard it's is because when I singed up I got denied because of my hemophilia and that's was in the early 90s, all she wants it's to go in as a medical tec to help the need that fight our country so for my kid dreams and everyone else that have a dream of going I will fight as well for our rights and dreams.

exposer
exposer 2013-11-27 11:55:10 -0600 Report

I have found that diabetics who wish to give military service should fight for there right to do so. I just found a Marine captain who became a double amputee was allowed to continue with a combat Unit after his rehabilitation and receiving high ended prosthetics. So I urge any Diabetic to fight for enlistment into the armed services and go for a non deployable status and work home side or they can open up the national guard and Air national guard to Type 1 Diabetics to serve their country. I'm looking to possibly bring charges up for me being denied yet special previsions was made for another double amputee.

FFsmokeEATER
FFsmokeEATER 2013-11-27 01:33:31 -0600 Report

I am a type 1 diabetic also…sadly your son will not be able to join any branch of the military. I tried enlisting several times, I even went as far as to research the SOPs for enlistment. As stated already a diabetic can not enlist, but if diabetes is developed while in the military they may stay in if their A1C is below 7.1% 3 months after diagnosis I think. When I found this out, a friend of mine that is a marine told me to check out the fire technology program at a local tech college. Tell your son he can still serve his community as a firefighter, law enforcement, border patrol, or something along those lines. Best of luck!

Pschlesiona
Pschlesiona 2013-04-19 12:01:46 -0500 Report

Actually, that is not correct. I'm a former Marine and my son has always wanted to join so I double-checked with contacts I still have in the Corps. At the discretion of the service branch, a person who contracts diabetes while already serving may be allowed to remain on active duty (no guarantee). However, DoD policy is that diabetics cannot be accepted for (new) enlistment or commissioning.

jdfr
jdfr 2013-01-23 23:21:59 -0600 Report

Actually everybody a diabetic can join the marines if they get a pump. Look it up USA marine captain nick lozar was diagnosed with diabetes in 2009 and came backwith pump this just goes out there that us diabetic can anything a normal person can do

Anonymous
Anonymous 2013-11-09 21:02:28 -0600 Report

Actually, they cannot join the military with a pump. Only if they were already in the military they might under some circumstances stay.

Hurricane1992
Hurricane1992 2012-11-29 13:50:48 -0600 Report

There is no reason why we diabetics at what ever stage or type can not join the military any branch any speciality!!! We are no different thatn anyone else!! If I can be a Medic in the civi world I should be able to be one in my Beloved Marine Corps!! If I can be a Police Officer in My state then I should also be able to join the Marine corps to be an MP!!! It is discrimination… Point blank!! I plan to fight it! anyone else???

Gabby
GabbyPA 2010-07-25 08:45:36 -0500 Report

Unfortunately, there are some jobs that it is just not safe to do as a diabetic. Not just for you, but also for those around you. My brother used to drive a big rig. His diabetes was a huge issue with that. Not so much because of the schedule, but if he would have had a sudden low while driving, he would have become a danger to so many innocent people on the road.

The same for the military. When you have to march for miles, be at your best and always be alert, diabetes can be an issue. As we all know, lows can hit without warning and then you become the one who needs help instead of being there for your unit. It is a risk that soldiers cannot take.

I don't know if there are places that you can be that are administrative that you don't have to go through boot camp to get there.

Neverquit155
Neverquit155 2014-04-15 22:37:59 -0500 Report

Gabby you only look at Diabetes in the negative view. As diabetes we know that we will face problems with our blood sugar ,like your brother who drive the truck,. But if you really only look at the negatives you could say "that diabetics should be banned form shooting ranges because they might hold a gun and pass out and shoot someone." The truth should be that the military should have test to see how well your diabetes is and to find solutions for the low blood sugar in the battle field problem. This is my point of view [the positive :) ]

Roy531
Roy531 2010-03-14 13:26:13 -0500 Report

One problem a diabetic would have with the military, you do not always get to eat when you should, plus if in a combat situation and need to eat something, you can't stop to eat. That could put your life at risk because of low blood sugars let alone everybody that would be with you trying to help you.

officervanessa
officervanessa 2010-03-14 11:31:58 -0500 Report

in highschool i was recruited to join the army as an army nurse. i was so excited because they were going to pay for all of my schooling and i really looked up to the military. well… as soon as my physical came around and they found out i had type 1 diabetes… that was the end of that. i tried to fight it- i was saying "well- i will be a nurse! im not going to be on of the soldiers!!" they said anyone associated with the military had to have certain standards of health… and diabetes was not within the "standard"… my little brother has since joined the army and is an airborne army ranger… i live through him… haha… unfortunately, your child with diabetes might have to live his military dream through the other son who is in the army. i know it sucks… sorry :(

Angie Rae
Angie Rae 2009-09-24 02:56:08 -0500 Report

I know it doesn't seem fair, but if you are on insulin or taking oral diabetic medications, you cannot join the military. I work for the military as a civilian and have type 1 diabetes too. The military won't let diabetics join because they can't have a diabetic with hypoglycemia using firearms, or being in a dangerous situation. I have done some pretty goofy things when I was hypoglycemic, so kind of understand where the military is coming from. It's great he wants to join, but unfortunately, us diabetics cannot have any job we want. We cannot be police officers or fly airplanes either, among a lot of other jobs which would put us or anybody else at risk. Hope you understand.

jrock50
jrock50 2014-02-27 04:41:28 -0600 Report

I agree with some of what your saying but also have to disagree with some. I am a Type 1 Diabetic and also wanted to join the military. My whole life I have stayed active in the gym and constantly training in some fashion. My A1C stays 7 or below and always has. Here is where the disagreeing begins. I have been a full time police officer for nearly 14 years and 11 of those years have been an active member of our SWAT team. My entire team is aware of this and only occasionally do I get a wisecrack calling me handicapped or something else to be funny, cops must have thick skin as we are a hard crowd. On top of all of this I also spent one year working for a company named, or formerly named, Blackwater. I just think when you have something as we do it should motivate you and make you use your imagination more in order to fulfill the desire I have always had to help and serve others.

briankdavis
briankdavis 2014-01-14 08:02:30 -0600 Report

The Sheriff of my county is Diabetic. I have been in law enforcement over 20 years and have worked with many fine Diabetic Type 1 and 2 officers

amazinglycrazie
amazinglycrazie 2012-04-04 09:35:42 -0500 Report

we r in dangerous situations everyday and in situations where our sugar effects others but yet when we want to join the military thats thier excuse to not let us in!? is it wrong for me to be angry , hurt and confused ?

kevin94
kevin94 2012-07-24 05:11:25 -0500 Report

No, I don't find it wrong at all, I am diabetic although its type 2 not 1 I'm guessing they would'nt let me join either I'm gonna call a recruiter this morning because I've been wanting to join pretty much all my life and just in the last year I find out I'm diabetic but I do understand their reasons, I know I have been low and passed out or not been able to opperate at full capacity because of it and putting myself in another soldiers boots, I wouldn't want someone beside me that I didn't know will be able to have my back as well as me his/hers, not just me watching over him/her making sure they didn't fall out. So I hate it myself but if I can't, I can't, gotta find something else to do.

Gabby
GabbyPA 2012-04-04 16:30:49 -0500 Report

It is not "wrong" for you to be angry or have strong feelings about this. Wanting to serve is a very heart felt thing. But there are things that you have to accept in the safety of the group, and a diabetic is not really a safe person in the battle field. They need to be focused on the enemy, not worried about you.

I am taking a Citizen Emergency Response Team class and one of the things they teach us first is that we don't need to ADD to the problem at hand. We have to know our limits. There are other things you can do to serve. You just have to find your niche.

H.D.
H.D. 2009-09-24 05:03:14 -0500 Report

Angie,
I'm not sure what state that you live in but you can have diabetes and still be a police officer in the state of Texas.

Harlen
Harlen 2009-09-24 14:59:26 -0500 Report

But not on S.W.A.T team

DeputyDan
DeputyDan 2010-07-24 21:55:19 -0500 Report

Wrong I am a current police officer on a S.W.A.T team it is possible. Also know people with type II diabetes who have joined military by proving their diabetes was under control through diet and exercise.

rcmodelr
rcmodelr 2009-10-04 00:02:50 -0500 Report

Since at least 2003, if not longer… a Diabetic (even one using Insulin) CAN get an FAA Class 3 Medical Certificate AND become an aircraft PILOT…

Problem is, with the restrictions placed on Diabetics using Insulin, you're limited to ONLY being able to pilot a private aircraft, with NO way to legally make any income from flying.

If you use Insulin, the FAA won't let you become a Flight Instructor, Airline Pilot, or many other flying occupations.

However, in the USA, there is at least ONE Insulin Dependent Diabetic who s an air show aerobatic demo pilot, (He is shown flying his plane on a YouTube Video) and I think you could MAYBE also find an income providing flying job such as towing advertising banners or flying for arial photography… But I'm not sure on that.

If site handles links correctly, here's a link for the video of the Type 1 Diabetic Pilot… http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJ78GLWP8P0

rcmodelr
rcmodelr 2010-03-13 22:05:48 -0600 Report

Actually, even in the USA… There is AT LEAST ONE Type 1 Diabetic PILOT performing in public AIRSHOWS!!! Performing aerobatic maneuvers that, at present, are considered to be the "Most Dangerous" aerobatic performances for ALL PILOTS… ESPECIALLY those with Diabetes…

rcmodelr
rcmodelr 2010-03-13 22:20:17 -0600 Report

IF my finances would allow, I'd LOVE to become a FAA licensed Pilot WITH Diabetes… And based on how much I've always LOVED roller-coasters, and unusual attitudes of my body… IF allowed the chance, I'm sure I could fly virtually ANY currently available aircraft…

When my brother rented a Robinson R-22 Helicopter in MN… The contract he signed stated he'd not allow anybody other than HIM to touch ANY controls unless ALL MOVING PARTS had STOPPED MOVING!!!

The person who checked him out told him "This is purely company policy… You are rated as a Helicopter Instructor… Whatever you do away from the public airport is up to you!!!"

When he took us for rides… I was the ONLY ONE with Diabetes that he took for a ride… I was ALSO the ONLY ONE he took for several rides, and was able to hold the rented helicopter in a "Rock Solid HOVER" to point where my brother commented that I had acquired the feel for hovering a helicopter SOLIDLY… MORE CONFIDENTLY than ANY Military student he had instructed could do within 6 WEEKS of DUAL INSTRUCTION!!!

I had fewer than 5 MINUTES Instruction, and was able to hold the Robinson R-22 Helicopter in a SOLID HOVER, transition into Forward flight, and return to SOLID HOVER with literally less than TWO MINUTES of flight instruction!!! ALL (100% of my relatives), were COMPLETELY UNABLE to hold the rented helicopter in ANYTHING resembling a "SOLID HOVER" condition…

Diabetes, at least in MY situation, presents NO LIMITS!!!

It is the Federal and Local Government regulations that place the IRRATIONAL LIMITS upon what I can do in my life!!!

DeputyDan
DeputyDan 2010-07-24 21:53:54 -0500 Report

I am a diabetic police officer and know many others. I also am a former Federal Law Enforcment Officer with the U.S. Dept. of Justice all with diabetes.

briankdavis
briankdavis 2014-01-14 08:05:40 -0600 Report

The Sheriff of my county is Diabetic. I have been in law enforcement over 20 years and have worked with many fine Diabetic Type 1 and 2 officers. My son is diabetic Type 1. Stay Safe Brother

Turtle
Turtle 2009-09-23 18:55:16 -0500 Report

I am sorry to tell you but he cannot join any military branches w/ diabetes. Try to get him interested in doing something for a charitable organization here in the US. Like Big Brothers. He might even be able to ask to be assigned to a boy with diabetes. They would have lots to talk about. He would still be helping someone.
Turtle

Harlen
Harlen 2009-09-23 15:27:46 -0500 Report

No they will not let him in if they know he has it

Frustrated mom
Frustrated mom 2009-09-23 15:41:46 -0500 Report

Even if he has a pump?

jtausch
jtausch 2009-09-23 17:35:58 -0500 Report

not even with a pump unfortunly the look at the ability to go where there is very limited medical services only a military deplorable hospital with limited services. Plus the fact if something goes wrong with the pump and he has blood sugar problems he could be putting his fellow soldiers at risk

Hahawow
Hahawow 2010-06-17 20:19:53 -0500 Report

I'm 13, I wanted too be a Marine. I am in the Cival Air Patrol, A great place too be! One thing that I may suggest, That I might consider now, I understand MOST soilder's would say that they are soilders for hire. A PSC, Or rather known as a Private Security Contractor… They go over - sease. Most depends on the type of job you want. If he's like me, Where you HATE desk jobs, This would be the closest thing, Too combat expirience for a diabetic. I've called EVERY last branch recruiter, And NONE will allow diabetics. For one thing that I have a question for, Is why will the USCG not allow diabetics, From what I understand they do not go over sease? Not sure. But all us diabetics can do, Is pray that one day a cure is on the way…There is like 5 treatments for one, And a lady I do not know her personal, Just from hearing it from a diabetic camp in my state…' Has had, The stem cell done too her, Being diabetic for 46 years! And it worked fine, And know today she is diabetic/insulin free! She is 54. I'm going too keep my hopes up, Until the time comes when I'm out of Hs, And if not maybe just a little later. Best wishes too you, And your son! :) If he wants too email me at Modanonum9@mchsi.com small!

briankdavis
briankdavis 2014-01-14 08:09:50 -0600 Report

Hang in there, my son was going to the Naval Academy until he found out. He is still going to apply but if he does not make it, he is thinking that he will go to work for DOD. I know there will be a cure in your and my son's life and probably in my parent's lifetime!

jrodd
jrodd 2012-08-03 17:14:29 -0500 Report

Hi deputyDan i have Type 2 diabetes and control it with diet and exercise, i was told by a new hampshire army recruiter that they wouldnt even let me sign a waiver. Im not sure if that was him not wanting to do paper work or if he was fallowing procedure, but i would like to know if its true that i can sign a waiver as long as im not insulin dependent? email me at zeoscyth@hotmail.com small thank you for your time.

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