Administering Insulin in Public Washrooms

S-M
By S-M Latest Reply 2017-11-28 16:03:33 -0600
Started 2017-11-20 21:54:16 -0600

Hello!

I am a newly diagnosed type 1 diabetic, and I am doing a school project in which we are creating a new product. As a type 1 diabetic, I face the problem of having a sanitary flat surface to place my glucose reader and insulin pen down when in a public washroom.

I am posting to find out if other insulin users have this problem, how they currently are addressing this problem, and if there was a product out there if they would use it?

The product would be a light weight, compact, foldable item that would hook to the door of a bathroom stall and provide a flat surface for people to place their diabetes supplies while they test their glucose levels and administer their insulin.

Any feedback on this idea and problem is welcome :)


6 replies

Type1Lou
Type1Lou 2017-11-28 16:03:33 -0600 Report

I have found that I can test my BG discretely in public, without attracting attention. Most people around me don't even realize I've done it and I've never experienced any problems from doing so. This was also true for insulin injections prior to my going on an insulin pump.

NewSong53
NewSong53 2017-11-23 10:30:29 -0600 Report

I carry a large flat-bottomed tote with me because I have to walk or take public transportation everywhere — and there are things I need like snacks and bottled water in case I'm gone longer than expected. I set my bag on the countertop while washing my hands. I then remove the meter and one test strip and grab the lancet with my other hand to prick my finger. It's very awkward but public restrooms are very iffy. I am not prone to lows and I am type 2, so I'm usually safe if I take my readings right before I leave and when I return. And the snacks I pack are things like nuts, seedless grapes or cheese sticks so I don't worry about large highs. For someone whose BG suddenly drops or rises, it is a predicament and I'm surprised no one has come up with a product by now!!

suecsdy
suecsdy 2017-11-22 18:39:56 -0600 Report

When I was using insulin, I never felt the need to hide in the bathroom to test or inject. I frequently test before a meal when I eat out or even when I'm shopping if I feel the need to. While I did try to be discreet when injecting the insulin, I figured if anyone had a problem with it, it was easily explained. No one ever said anything if they did notice.

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2017-11-27 15:27:57 -0600 Report

A friend told me her and her husband was in a restaurant having dinner. A woman at the table beside her too out her needle and insulin. A lady at the table beside them saw the needle and fainted. She fell and bumped her head on the tiled floor. The woman's husband said she is extremely needle phobia. The woman with the needle was asked to remove it. She told the manager she was diabetic and had to inject before she ate. The manager said he understood that but she had to also respect the needs of the other customer. She said they the waiters are asking people who inject publicly in the dining room to go to the rest room of their vehicle to inject.

I understand both sides but no one knows who is needle phobic. I think people should take into consideration of people around them. I never test my blood sugar publicly because I know there are people who cannot stand the sight of blood. I am not so selfish that I don't think of others not that you are being selfish. Some people do things just for attention not that you are but I just think of those around me that might not want to see blood.

Gabby
GabbyPA 2017-11-22 11:24:19 -0600 Report

I have never injected in a stall. Your product sounds like a good solution for that situation. If I use a bathroom, I do it at the hand washing counter. I guess I am not that private when it comes to that. Fortunately, I usually get to inject at home or in a private space of my choosing. I am sure I touch more dirty things in my hikes and camping, and I inject where I need to then.

And just a side note in your design of the product, the spray from a flushing toilet can reach 3-5 feet, so maybe a cover of sorts may be in the consideration. That way you can keeps other unseen things out as well.

theJeff
theJeff 2017-11-21 11:45:53 -0600 Report

having been a Type 1 for 20 years or so I’ve always found the issue to be portability. If a product could fold up, say to the size of 8”x4”, be lightweight, and fit in with the rest of my supplies I would consider it. Of course I generally just run everything out of my carry around balanced on my lap.