Visually impaired career ideas

Anonymous
By Anonymous Latest Reply 2017-05-08 19:37:20 -0500
Started 2017-04-18 01:19:33 -0500

Last year was a rough year. I got really I'll while pregnant and lost our baby. While pregnant, my eyes got really bad but not much could be done due to being pregnant. Because they couldn't treat with injections, I ended up losing all sight in one of my eyes.
I'm finally feeling ready to get back into the world again. The problem I'm having is.. my whole working life I have only been in restaurants. And no restaurant wants to hire a half blind diabetic. I'm hoping someone might have some ideas on what a partially blind person could do for a career. Something that I could do if I lost the sight in my other eye completely as well. I've googled ideas.. and most things say, visually impaired or blind people can do any job anyone else can. But let's be realistic.. working in a fast pace kitchen. With knives and hot oil and grills.. is not an idealistic job for someone who can't see. So any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


9 replies

Stuart1966
Stuart1966 2017-05-08 19:37:20 -0500 Report

Massage Therapy comes to mind…

Computers with auditory systems might fit.

Have you explored national associations for visually impared.

Sure there are some jobs with visual difficulties that won't work, but not too many I can think of that with a pinch of tweaking, could work just fine.

Gabby
GabbyPA 2017-04-25 10:13:39 -0500 Report

I am sorry for your loss. Getting out and doing is a way to find normal again.

I know that if you can type, there are people needed to type up recorded notes by doctors. Maybe even a stenographer in a court room? That would require no vision. The video that Nick shared is amazing, if you have not seen it. Finding a creative outlet might help. Something tactile can be enriching. Sharing with children who have disabilities can be rewarding.

Maybe even do some research on Helen Keller...She spoke to the masses as an advocate. Perhaps you could find a group that needs that kind of inspiration from your own story. A grief counselor for those who have lost a child as you did? No sight is required to heal broken hearts.

Or since food service is your familiarity, maybe a food critic or cook book collaborator? You cook with all your senses, someone can fill the sight gap for you, but all the others will be very alive.

There are endless possibilities now while you still have one eye to read, study and learn a new way of living. It may not feel like it, but the door of opportunity has been opened up to you.

onafixedincome
onafixedincome 2017-04-19 23:27:59 -0500 Report

Welcome back to the world, and glad you found us! Sorry you went through all that, you're a tough lady.

I'd say find something you like that you can do by feel…you may not be unique, but if you are good at it, and happy doing it, that's more valuable in the long run. I know that crafters who are limited in one way or another, around my area anyway, are deeply admired and respected and some do command some rather startling prices. Not all, though.

Stay away from things that hazard the remaining eye, if you can—and if you can't, ALWAYS wear eye protection even if it looks absurd.

What about culinary art? Sculpting icing, breads, ice, sugar etc might be something to consider, since you're kitchen-wise. I suggest that because it's something you can likely do in your home kitchen (or a rented one) without the fast-pace and hazards inherent in a normal restaurant kitchen…and yet you could produce unique pieces of art that might well be in good demand.

Something that might make some income would be custom knife sharpening. With, say, a trailer that can be driven to a central site in an area and surrounding businesses bring in their clipper blades, knives, etc…a trailer will always have the same tools in the same places, and sharpness is a matter of feel…

Fiber art is something also largely based on feel—spinning, weaving, felting…silks, fur, feathers, wools…

Slower but better paying might be becoming front-desk reception, for instance…and don't forget the possibilities of doing massage. At a buck or two a minute, it's worth thinking about.

I'm pitching out ideas at random; I'm not you and I don't know if you have other limitations—of interest or of capability—but if you want some more, I'm sure we can all brainstorm and come up with more to add to the list.

Again, welcome, and don't be a stranger. Keep us posted!!

WASHED OUT
WASHED OUT 2017-04-18 13:11:26 -0500 Report

The American disabilities agency will help retrain you for a job that meets your physical abilities. Do some research on this you may find something you truly love doing. In 1996 when I had a back injury they paid for all my retraining , room, food, and mileage. Check with the (IDEA) in your area. I worked another 18 years at my trained profession until my Health got so bad that I no longer could pass the federal required physical.
U.S. Department of Labor — ODEP - Office of Disability …
www.dol.gov/odep/topics/disability.htm
To find additional disability information, … A Guide to the Individualized Education Program; Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA)

haoleboy
haoleboy 2017-04-18 15:07:16 -0500 Report

loss of vision in one eye is not considered a disability unless there is a significant loss of vision in the other. however, you may be able to find employment assistance
(I'm 20/20 in my remaining eye so … not disabled)

WASHED OUT
WASHED OUT 2017-04-18 15:16:12 -0500 Report

Sounds like she is having trouble also with the remaining eye. My insurance just called today to set up another eye exam, I hadn't realized that it has been over a year ago since the last one. Part of their program is a check list of test for someone that has diabetes so she said. Most of those have been completed except the eyes. I think maybe my vision has changed since the last exam, straining more or having to use my glasses for reading. I also have never had a problem with distance but now that also is fuzzing up. I remember those 20/20 days.

haoleboy
haoleboy 2017-04-18 15:41:05 -0500 Report

keep on top of your eyes. I see my ophthalmologist every 3 months. he's very proactive in protecting my "good eye".
eye care is very important … just ask somebody that has one.

WASHED OUT
WASHED OUT 2017-04-18 16:49:49 -0500 Report

I can imagine it is Steve. My cousin that lives next door had one of his put out in the Coal mines and has had trouble with his other one at times. Scary situation. I am to go on the 26th of this month to get them checked again.

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