DIABETES

Miracle
By Miracle Latest Reply 2009-07-11 17:14:51 -0500
Started 2009-07-11 14:00:41 -0500

WHERE DOES DIABETES ACTUALLY COME FROM?
WHAT IS DIABETES AND HOW DOES IT AFFECT YOUR LIFE?
HOW DO YOU ACTUALLY KNOW YOU HAVE THE DISEASE?


3 replies

kdroberts
kdroberts 2009-07-11 14:28:08 -0500 Report

1. No one knows where diabetes comes from. Best answer is it's linked to genes and environment.

2. No one really knows what diabetes is or how it works. Best answer is that type 1 is an autoimmune disease but other than that not a lot is known. It effects your life a great deal because what you eat and do directly impacts it.

3. Two fasting tests of 126 or above. A fail on the oral glucose tolerance test. A non fasting reading of 200 or above accompanies by diabetic symptoms. Not sure if this has been adopted yet but an A1c of 6.5 or above has been recommended as a new diagnostic criteria. They are all just guesses really and will likely continue to change as they have done over time.

bru17
bru17 2009-07-11 16:21:05 -0500 Report

forgive me…Diabetes is a condition in which either the pancreas is not functioning properly…or the beta cells are having trouble with glucose identification…type one is autominmune…type 2 can be auto-immune…i will send more

kdroberts
kdroberts 2009-07-11 17:14:51 -0500 Report

I don't disagree but that doesn't explain the why or what., it's kind of a narrow view that has been formed with what we currently know. Why does the autoimmune attack happen? What factors are involved? What really is diabetes? Why do people with diabetes have so varied treatments? Why is it that a non-diabetic with similar numbers to a well controlled diabetic have a lower chance of heart disease, eye issues, neuropathy, kidney problems and tooth problems? Why is it common for diabetics to have problems with cholesterol? Why does type 1 often skip generations? Really, diabetes research is in it's infancy, probably the most common chronic illness that we know the least about. An example, they just published data suggesting that there is a subset of type 1 who are genetically programmed to be more prone to random lows. That would go someway to explain why some type 1's have unexplainable low blood sugar episodes. type 2 as an autoimmune disease is also something that is just becoming a more agreed upon issue.

The more you actually research diabetes the more it becomes clear that we really don't know much about it and are essentially just treating symptoms as best we can because. The real cause and the real understanding of the whys and whats are still unknown. That is why a cure doesn't seem to be around the corner. you can't cure something if you don't really know what it is or how you get it.

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