Blood pressure and diet managment options

gifmac
By gifmac Latest Reply 2015-03-26 07:05:50 -0500
Started 2015-03-25 10:18:54 -0500

I'm newly diagnosed type one diabetes and using insulin pump. My glucose is still running round 200mg/dl. I want to ask about the treatment option that has helped you to manage your blood sugar successful and at the same time have a good quality of life? Is there any type of diet that is helpful?


4 replies

jayabee52
jayabee52 2015-03-26 07:05:50 -0500 Report

Howdy Gifmac
I really don't have much to say except to agree with T1Lou when she said that carb counting helped her a lot.

I am T 2 and find that reducing my carbs helped me a lot. I have a "good quality of life" but my definition may differ from yours.

Praying you get it under control and in the 80 to 130 mg/dl range
James

Sopies Grandma
Sopies Grandma 2015-03-25 16:19:47 -0500 Report

i am 59 and I am type 1.5 LADA and I use pump. For myself, the secret is counting carbs. I also don't eat anything white, plenty of whole wheat options to choose from. When I want cheese on anything I make my own cheese sauce, which also cuts down on the calories.If my numbers area 200 or over I get up and take a walk or wii bowl, just about any excerise will bring my number down. also my ISF is 108 which is really high, so just a little bit of insulin will drop my numbers. Hope you find what works for you. Different strokes for different folks. but be patient, its just a matter of finding the right mix for yourself… :)

Type1Lou
Type1Lou 2015-03-25 15:03:27 -0500 Report

Low carbohydrate has been the key for me. I limit myself to 120 total carbohydrate grams per day and have been able to maintain my weight around 120 lbs (I'm a 5'3" tall 65-year old moderately active female.) I know if I increase my exercise level, I could get my HbA1c into the mid to low 6's. It is currently 6.9. I adopted the low carb approach after reading Dr Richard Bernstein's book "Diabetes Solution". Dr Bernstein, a life-long type 1 diabetic, went back to school in his mid-40's to earn his medical degree and to gain credibility for his approach to diabetes. He was an engineer and developed his approach after following the prevailing medical advice of the times that did not give him the control he wanted. Reading his book in the early 2000's was a turning point for me in my control. I had been diagnosed in 1976.

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