Freeking out with middle of the night low blood sugers

roxanne bohnnow
By roxanne bohnnow Latest Reply 2014-12-12 19:24:38 -0600
Started 2014-12-02 12:33:53 -0600

I don't know if this has ever happened to any of the members here but last night i had a BG reading of 97 at bed time so I did not take my Lantus shot that I normally would. At 3:30 am a voice was screaming in my head to wake up. Upon waking I knew that something was wrong and made my way out to the living room to my desk and took a blood reading. My BG was 49. My body was shaking like all get out. I grabbed a spoon and a jar of jam and went to town. After eating about eight spoonfulls of jam I went back to bed. I fully expected my next BG reading to be up in the 200 to 300 range. To my surprise my Bg reading was only 166. Can anyone explain what happened to me?


26 replies

Anonymous
Anonymous 2014-12-09 12:14:58 -0600 Report

Being that badly diabetic, I could not live like that with the regiments and routines testing and episodes of high and low blood sugars and preventing it day and night. I'll just handle hypoblycemic episodes as they happen and hope for the best. I can't live my life around my blood sugars. IF being diabetic is this bad I'd rather die.

roxanne bohnnow
roxanne bohnnow 2014-12-09 18:04:53 -0600 Report

And I would rather live, it is the choice that I make for my family, my husband, my children, my grand children, and my great grand child. Yes I am old and I want to live a very long life. You see I am still a child in my mind. I have things that I need to do now in order for me to live. They don't detract anything from my life and it is not a burden for me to check my blood levels and give myself a shot of insulin when needed. I still go to town and do the shopping and have lunch out at a restaurant of my choice. I get to see my children and on occasion go to the movies with them or go out for a pizza and a beer. I may be a diabetic but I am not going to roll over and let this thing kick my ass. So before you say that you can't live your life like this, think of all the things you are going to miss out on because you gave up. Now go talk to your family and find out just how much you are loved and needed by them. Hugs to you and yours from my family. Please don't give up.

Type1Lou
Type1Lou 2014-12-03 15:35:02 -0600 Report

Prior to starting on a pump in 2011, I was on Lantus and Novolog. I had begun to have serious and more frequent early morning low BG's. My endo changed the time of day for my Lantus shot from bedtime to first thing in the morning. It helped some, but I finally decided to try an insulin pump (after 35 years on shots) I think aging was a factor in changing my metabolism…I had been on MDI for years with no major prblems but when I hit my late 50's and early 60's, the low BG episodes became scarier and more frequent.

Gabby
GabbyPA 2014-12-03 13:33:55 -0600 Report

I had a 47 one night while watching TV at home. It is scary when you are awake, even more when sleeping. Our levels can drop at night and if our liver doesn't get to it before we do, it can be really rough. I am glad you are doing better, but I would talk to the doctor to see what you might want to do to prevent it.
Did you do anything like exercise before bed? Or have a particularly active day? Sometimes just an active day can catch up to us at night because our bodies keep using insulin long after the activity is over.

I would suggest following the 15/15 rule to treat your lows though. http://www.diabeticconnect.com/diabetes-discussions/general/16969-15-15-rule-do-you-know-it

valentine lady
valentine lady 2014-12-03 09:55:09 -0600 Report

Hi Roxanne,
I know how freaked out you are now and especially the night it happened.. It is true, the Lord woke you up and gave your wits about
you to eat jelly. But a couple of tips. Never go to bed anymore when
your BG is in your 90's or even in the low100's.. Thes r are normal ranges but not for people who drop low at night. When you eat you in bedtime snack make it substantial. Protein is best. Peanut Butter and crackers
Something like that. Always keep something to eat by your bed you
can grab and eat right awsy. Of course speak to your Dr. about t&is issue, I know I sound like I'm preaching to yoo. I'm not trying to. But I
Know. I wrote a whole discussion about this very subject. It happens to me and often. I pray your able to get this under control quickly.
Hugs,
valentine lady

NewSong53
NewSong53 2014-12-02 19:01:21 -0600 Report

Roxanne, I believe God woke you to save you. I don't know what you could have done differently — your doctor should be able to help answer that question. I had a similar experience when I woke once shivering and trembling uncontrollably — it was because my BG was way too high (I think about 475 — before I got on meds). It took maybe 5 minutes before I could control the shaking enough to check my BG (I thought my BG dropped too low — glad I checked first). I called a friend and she told me to get up and exercise around the apartment for awhile and call back. It did finally stop the shaking and teeth-chatterting and my BG reading was down about 50+. That was all the convincing I needed to know that exercise is so important to keep my BG reading down. I began taking this all much more seriously after that episode. Good luck — you're doing your best and it takes time to know what makes our bodies "tick".

Glucerna
Glucerna 2014-12-02 17:19:15 -0600 Report

This is a really good question to ask your doctor so you can figure out what caused the low. I'm glad you woke up and knew to get in some fast-digesting carbohydrate. ~Lynn @Glucerna

roxanne bohnnow
roxanne bohnnow 2014-12-02 14:28:57 -0600 Report

This was the first time that I have had a hypoglycemia experience, but not the first time dealing with one. My husband had an episode a little over a year ago to the point that he did not know who I was. Each time I tried to help him he would become combative. I finally gave up and called 911 to get some help. Last night on the other hand was even more frightening, being that I recognized that something was wrong. The truly scary part was the voice in my head tell me to wake up from a sound sleep. Who or what ever that voice was, I want it to know that I am very grateful for it's help. For with out that help I may very well have never woken up. I am not asking any of you to believe in Angels', but this has me thinking about things outside my scope of knowledge.

RebDee
RebDee 2014-12-02 13:49:37 -0600 Report

Hypoglycemia is low blood sugar. I am lucky that my Labra-Dane has somehow taught himself that when my blood sugar goes down, he smacks me with his gigantic paw and wakes me up. Although he has not been trained, he is my ketone dog.

sweetslover
sweetslover 2014-12-02 14:05:25 -0600 Report

My dog, a weimaraner, also gets concerned if my BG starts to get low. Aren't animals wonderful?

RebDee
RebDee 2014-12-02 14:39:57 -0600 Report

Dogs are the best. I have a 9 years old, 123 lb. Labra-Dane named Artemus Gordon from the Wild Wild West who was named for my friend and actor, Ross Martin. I also have a 5 year old 13 lb. Bishi-Poo named Marcus Gordon, who was nicknamed Barky Marky as he barks so much.
I have only had dogs since 1970 as my mother was frightened and would not allow dogs in our home. I am allergic to cats as is my daughter and grandson.

RebDee
RebDee 2014-12-02 13:47:49 -0600 Report

having had this phenomena many times, I can tell you that you had hypoglycemic episode. When you saw that your blood sugar was 97 before you went to bed, you should have had something to eat (milk and cookies, a sandwich). There was no place to go but down for your BS and down it went. You are lucky that your body was shaking so much that it woke you up. No more jam, real food is better, an orange, some peanut butter and jam sandwich.

Michael V Baker
Michael V Baker 2014-12-02 13:22:46 -0600 Report

Sorry, did not read the lack of lantus injection. You must have had insulin still in your physiological system idle that had not been received by your cell receptors in the last 6 hours. Were you more active that particular evening?

Michael V Baker
Michael V Baker 2014-12-02 13:22:35 -0600 Report

Sorry, did not read the lack of lantus injection. You must have had insulin still in your physiological system idle that had not been received by your cell receptors in the last 6 hours. Were you more active that particular evening?

Michael V Baker
Michael V Baker 2014-12-02 13:19:53 -0600 Report

You likely overdosed on Lantus if your doseage and BGs are relative every evening to above. Surprised if overeating spoonfuls of 'jam' your BG was only 156. Bet $100 your BGs all morning were a struggle to sustain from rising above 250…As a D1 for decades, learned to moderately ingest at low BGs with about 20-30 carbos max.

jayabee52
jayabee52 2014-12-02 13:09:32 -0600 Report

Howdy Roxanne
You have experienced a hypo episode. My fiancee`, Valentine Lady has been experiencing these for about one month now. You can read her of her experiences of being hypo in a nursing home in her discussion "Walk in hypoglycemia hell" Only it seems you still have warning signs when you are going into a low. She does not and will drop unexpectedly. Her first clue that something is amiss is she blacks out.

It is unknown how long she had been unconscious when the workers in the NH found her each time. But they had to give her a glucagon injection (has happened twice so far) and at one point her BG (blood glucose) level was 27 mg/dl.

Her last episode she got down to 50 mg/dl but it takes her night RN was, I believe responsible for that. He took her BG only 20 minutes after she finished with her supper (should have been 2 hrs) and her BG was almost 200 so he drew up 6 U of insulin, and immediately injected her over her objections. Fortunately he seemed to watch her closely through the night and when the crash came, thankfully, he seemed to be on top of it.

The discussion to which I refer may be found here ~ http://www.diabeticconnect.com/diabetes-discu...

I pray that this, for you, is only an isolated episode

James

rickperkins
rickperkins 2014-12-02 13:05:30 -0600 Report

I think you forgot to take your mitts on Jesus woke you up to tell you need to take care yourself because you going to get sick I believe you didn't you're so the that's what I think happened to you before that take your medicine and in Jesus SAY here take care of yourself it's up to make yourself feel better

jayabee52
jayabee52 2014-12-02 13:15:31 -0600 Report

Rick, do you really believe that Roxanne was not taking care of herself when she didn't take her Lantus injection on a BG of 97?

rickperkins
rickperkins 2014-12-02 14:41:05 -0600 Report

Its okay sometimes we all forget to when we take medicine I'm a new diabetic number two and I do forget sometimes X just Manison that I never took before I can understand where she come from I am really busy and workaholic I work all day and all night
I go to bed my head on a pill I go to sleep sometimes I forget to take my medicine

roxanne bohnnow
roxanne bohnnow 2014-12-02 19:24:46 -0600 Report

Rick, you seem to be confused about what happened to me. I use insulin to lower my high blood sugar levels, the other night my levels were already low even before taking the insulin so I did not take the long lasting insulin called Lantus. I did not need it because of how low my blood sugar levels were. The problem stems from the fact that my levels continued to drop while I slept, something that I did not know could happen. You see, low blood sugar levels can kill you just as fast or even faster then high blood sugar levels can. This is what makes Diabetes a terrible disease. Diabetes kills more people then cancer each year. When we keep on top of this disease, we can live long and happy lives. We do hit that proverbial bump in the road just like I did last night.

RosalieM
RosalieM 2014-12-02 12:59:45 -0600 Report

Roxanne
What are you taking besides Lantus for your diabetes? That used to happen to me a lot when I took fast acting insulin. Now I only take 20 units of Lantus long acting insulin, (no drugs at all), in the evening and it never gets that low at night anymore.
What you ate, how much you exercised that day and what you take for your diabetes will play into it. If you can recall those things that will help you figure it out.

Grandma Rose

RosalieM
RosalieM 2014-12-02 12:58:53 -0600 Report

Roxanne
What are you taking besides Lantus for your diabetes? That used to happen to me a lot when I took fast acting insulin. Now I only take 20 units of Lantus long acting insulin, (no drugs at all), in the evening and it never gets that low at night anymore.
What you ate, how much you exercised that day and what you take for your diabetes will play into it. If you can recall those things that will help you figure it out.

Grandma Rose

roxanne bohnnow
roxanne bohnnow 2014-12-02 19:37:23 -0600 Report

I take 28 units of Humalog before each meal and 52 units of Lantus at bedtime. I am going to call the nurse at the Diabetes Center again tomorrow and we are going to go over my numbers and what I have been eating. I have been trying to keep my numbers down because three months ago I was running in the high 400's and 500's. I have given up a lot of things as far as food and drinks go.

RosalieM
RosalieM 2014-12-03 06:06:49 -0600 Report

If you don't mind Roxanne my being up front. This is a very serious matter as you know. From what you said, I suspect you are eating way too much carbohydrate for a diabetic still. Then trying to control your blood sugar with fast acting insulin. I know what the diabetes educators say about how many carbs you should eat. They are wrong!!! A high protein, high fiber diet with no sugar or starch, at least to get things under control is correct.. When you get a good control of your blood sugar, you may be able to add in some slow digesting carbs. Roxanne, it is not what you gave up for your diabetes, that affects your blood sugar it is what you are still eating that is causing the problem. Trying to control a too high carbohydrate diet with insulin is a disaster in the making. Been there done that but no more.
Grandma Rose