Questions about best time to check

JemRenee
By JemRenee Latest Reply 2014-11-11 10:17:14 -0600
Started 2014-11-06 17:50:40 -0600

I've been diagnosed with Type 2 for a year now but just kinda shrugged it off. Lately with readings being continually over 155 in the mornings before breakfast, I have started taking it more seriously. I'm trying now to do an average instead of just checking in the morning so when exactly are the best times to check to get a weekly average? I do take Metformin every day and am hoping that with cutting out the majority the my sweets and sodas that this will help on keeping it down.

Also, I'm new to this site, just joined today actually so thanks for any help y'all can give. :)


16 replies

Stuart1966
Stuart1966 2014-11-11 10:17:14 -0600 Report

Hello JemRenee:

Unless you are one of the strip companies (ie selling strips), there is a lot of different opinions on this one.

There are a host of arenas you can have an effect on your blood sugar readings.

The easiest is using correct testing procedure. If you hands have something on them which is high in sugar, that "contamination" can mess with your readings. Washing with warm water is all that is required to fix that one. Plus the warm water will help bring more blood to your finger tips, and easier to get droplets from them. Do not use alcohol swabs, etc. unless you hands are nasty dirty. Warm water is entirely sufficient.

Probably don't want to test in places that are very humid. Most meters don't play very well in steam filled rooms. Many meters do not like high or low temps. My point, try and take readings in environments which are machine friendly. Wet, very hot, very cold you can get weird readings, or meter errors. I'm not a fan of the latter, especially because it cost me my own blood to get that error.

The more consistent you are about when you test will give you stronger patterns. Get enough data, enough tests, enough background information and you can make better informed decisions.

As a diabetic, you will become aware of what makes up a single portion of any food with a little practice. The trick is making conscious, active choices. Its a barter system

Junk food by definition is bad for everybody whether a diabetic on not. It is just plain bad for us. Salty, fatty, sugary in huge quantities. Cutting back until you do not eat them is a good idea.

For the immediate future, what makes up a single portion of whatever you eat is likely the best goal. As an adult I eat lots of food, and am not restricted by much. But I've been a T1 my entire life. Most junk, I literally never learned, nor had any interest in trying either. Donuts, cake, pies, cookies… I can eat them, just never learned to like them very much. But I digress…

Most food have measurements called carbs or calories for one portion. Essentially whichever you prefer counting, will give you an idea what you have eaten in a day. Depending on your age, any special health concerns, and your activity level both for work and pleasure/exercise have to be figured into the math.

There are some very easy basic rules to work with in terms of healthy eating.

Of them the simplest is getting a strong written record of whatever you are taking in the course of a day. Get a tiny flip book from the dollar store and write down everything that you eat. Do it for three days, then a week. Keep doing it until its a good habit.

You will miss a bunch of things, don't worry about that part. Do it for a week. Date, time, "portion", food the most detail you can enter without being a serious burden to do so. Annoying perhaps, but the better detail you can gather, the easier it will be for a dietitian to help you and even more so for you to become sentient and conscious what you eat and drink. Not a bad goal, right? Wanted to loose the ten pounds… well its a simple way to start. Accurate, written record.

Once you have the hang of doing that. The rest is pretty easy.

Some things you must put a stop to, cold-turkey so you can get easy answers, instead of having to figure out whats causing that higher reading(s)…

With practice, not hard. To start, not always easy for many. The whole self aware game again. Soda, candy, lets find substitutes. Bad for the teeth, the weight, and hard on the blood sugar readings.

It will come, but it takes some time for strong changes, new habits. You can and probably will have XYZ again, in the future, just not for right now. Once you have awareness, new health habits… you can revisit, make an active choice have a glass, a piece of whatever.

Merely my opinion, I could surely be mistaken…

sweetslover
sweetslover 2014-11-09 00:48:27 -0600 Report

Hey, Jem. I was diagnosed with D. about a month ago. When I first started testing, I just randomly chose different times of the day. I found this made it hard to see if I was doing any good with my diet, so I started testing first thing in the morning to get a comparison from one day to the next. Next week, I will test at a different time of day for a few weeks to get a feel for what happens after I eat.

suecsdy
suecsdy 2014-11-11 09:13:00 -0600 Report

My home health care nurse told me that the morning read was the most important one. I test before meals every day.

Glucerna
Glucerna 2014-11-09 15:41:12 -0600 Report

Planning ahead for when to test your blood sugar and how you can best use that information is a great strategy. Sometimes people test before and after a meal to gain understanding of how the food at that meal and that time of day affects them. ~Lynn @Glucerna

jayabee52
jayabee52 2014-11-06 23:20:10 -0600 Report

Howdy Jem
WELCOME to DC
You have received some great info here. I would also second the advice to test at 2 hrs after the FIRST bite of food (per my Dr's instructions).

Is Jem your given name or a nickname?

I nicknamed my late wife "Jem" and it has become a pet name for her. She loved it too.

God's best to you

James

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2014-11-06 20:40:41 -0600 Report

Hi and welcome to the DC Family.

As a T-2 who is in great control and only test every other day because I am in very good control of my diabetes, I learned when first diagnosed to tested before each meal to get a baseline then 2 hours after I ate. I did this for each meal. It also helped me learn what would cause my blood sugar to spike.

Cutting out sodas and sweets will help but it is only a start. You have to cut out foods that are high in carbs as well as cut out as much processed foods as possible. Adding exercise helps a great deal. A registered dietitian can help you learn to eat correctly.

As for finding the average, I tried that and is was off when it came time to for the lab to do my A1C. I just wait until it is time for the doctor to do it and work from there.

haoleboy
haoleboy 2014-11-06 18:35:25 -0600 Report

Hi JemRenee and welcome.
For me, as a type 2, the most (only?) effective use of the meter is to monitor my blood glucose levels after eating … helpful particularly when adding new foods to my "diet". I will test my BGL (Blood Glucose Level) immediately before eating to establish a baseline and then at 1 and/or 2 hours after eating (postprandial) to see if my BGL returns to my targeted levels.
If you are looking to establish an average like your A1c, I don't think that is really possible … but that's just my experience.
Most Type 2 diabetics have found that it takes more than just "cutting out sweets and sodas" to gain good control over your BGL. Eliminating those is certainly a good start but tight control of your total daily carbohydrate intake seems to help most of all. A consultation with your doctor or registered dietitian to establish daily carb limits as well as BGL targets would be a good start.
Just my 2 cents … I'm sure others will be along with their suggestions

namaste
Steve

JemRenee
JemRenee 2014-11-06 19:06:57 -0600 Report

Thanks Steve. When I was first diagnosed I spoke with my dr who suggested then about seeing a dietitian which I did not follow up on. I soon have a doctor's appt so I will talk to her about that. When talking about an average I was referring to the log book that is on here. It gives you a weekly average. I didn't know when the best time after a meal was to test.

tabby9146
tabby9146 2014-11-07 08:40:28 -0600 Report

some meters can give you an average, mine does. My meter is True Result. there are sites (and I think this one has it now too if I am not mistaken) where you can put in your numbers everyday, and get the average. What haoleboy and Joyce said I agree with and it is true about newly diagnosed testing first thing in the morning, then 2 hours after each meal, as they told me in diabetes class. I did this for months before I started checking less per day. Check before and after exercise too and eventually, with good control, you won't have to check as much every day. I check once a day, sometimes every other day, but I have good control. once you know what you can and can not eat, or what you need to eat very small portions of, even after years, you still need to check to make sure you are staying in control and when trying new foods. I was diagnosed 6 years ago. In class I learned, and also my doctor telling me, I could have almost everything, but in moderation. I was shocked at that. They told us no sodas and very small amounts of juice but they did not say we could never have juice. It is better to eat a small piece of fruit though than have juice, because of the fiber content and the nutrition you get from it, which is much better.

haoleboy
haoleboy 2014-11-06 19:37:05 -0600 Report

in a perfect world you should be back to "normal" after 2 hours so if I had to choose one time to check after I'd go with that

JemRenee
JemRenee 2014-11-06 19:06:38 -0600 Report

Thanks Steve. When I was first diagnosed I spoke with my dr who suggested then about seeing a dietitian which I did not follow up on. I soon have a doctor's appt so I will talk to her about that. When talking about an average I was referring to the log book that is on here. It gives you a weekly average. I didn't know when the best time after a meal was to test.

JemRenee
JemRenee 2014-11-06 19:06:35 -0600 Report

Thanks Steve. When I was first diagnosed I spoke with my dr who suggested then about seeing a dietitian which I did not follow up on. I soon have a doctor's appt so I will talk to her about that. When talking about an average I was referring to the log book that is on here. It gives you a weekly average. I didn't know when the best time after a meal was to test.

JemRenee
JemRenee 2014-11-06 19:06:33 -0600 Report

Thanks Steve. When I was first diagnosed I spoke with my dr who suggested then about seeing a dietitian which I did not follow up on. I soon have a doctor's appt so I will talk to her about that. When talking about an average I was referring to the log book that is on here. It gives you a weekly average. I didn't know when the best time after a meal was to test.

JemRenee
JemRenee 2014-11-06 19:06:22 -0600 Report

Thanks Steve. When I was first diagnosed I spoke with my dr who suggested then about seeing a dietitian which I did not follow up on. I soon have a doctor's appt so I will talk to her about that. When talking about an average I was referring to the log book that is on here. It gives you a weekly average. I didn't know when the best time after a meal was to test.