My vision.

Daniel89
By Daniel89 Latest Reply 2014-08-08 21:36:24 -0500
Started 2014-08-06 16:00:20 -0500

Hello all, I am a 25-year old male with juvenile diabetes. I was diagnosed in 2001 and to be quite honest I have never taken care of myself. Early on I was in the hospital often, but have been able to manage it enough now that I almost am never sick. I never test and up until recently I was eating more candy than a kid on Halloween. I am on an insulin regimen that consists of Lantis and Humalog.

With this all being said I come to my real concern…my eyes. Since graduating from college I have begun to take better care of myself. I exercise regularly, I have been watching what I eat, but I am still not testing. Within the last month and a half or so I have noticed that I am having problems focusing on things. Things that are at a little bit of a distance anyways. This has concerned me quite a bit and am wondering what this could be from. From previous discussions I have read, it seems that people who have high A1C levels and high glucose levels seem to have this problem until they get their levels under control. I am open to any ideas and I am very serious about wanting to take care of myself. Please help. Thanks!


8 replies

last of the red hot grandmas
last of the red hot grandmas 2014-08-08 21:36:24 -0500 Report

Daniel, why don't you test? I keep a log of my blood glucose levels and note what I ate or if I forgot to take my meds or took them late so that I can get a picture of what affects my blood sugar positively and negatively.
I test two or three times a day. Please don't play around with this. Diabetes can be devastating. I don't want to frighten you, but my mom lost her sight because she didn't take care of herself after she was diagnosed. She had many other health problems due to it as well. You are 25 and can have a great life ahead of you and are old enough to take responsibility and manage this. Please have your eyes tested and find out how often you should test your blood and do it.

Daniel89
Daniel89 2014-08-07 23:53:06 -0500 Report

Thank you all for the quick replies. I am have been testing multiple and I finally received my labs. A1C was 11.6 and I was reported to have very high cholesterol. I am starting Simvastatin tomorrow and am shopping for some better foods to make a decent and diabetic friendly meal. I know it is going ot be a challenge to get my numbers under control but I am looking forward to feeling better and having normal numbers,

Daniel89
Daniel89 2014-08-07 23:53:04 -0500 Report

Thank you all for the quick replies. I am have been testing multiple and I finally received my labs. A1C was 11.6 and I was reported to have very high cholesterol. I am starting Simvastatin tomorrow and am shopping for some better foods to make a decent and diabetic friendly meal. I know it is going ot be a challenge to get my numbers under control but I am looking forward to feeling better and having normal numbers,

youngdiabetic
youngdiabetic 2014-08-06 18:33:12 -0500 Report

I read in many posts that it is due to high sugars. When u normalize it comes back. But consult a doctor ASAP. I understand that you have been not taking good care of yourself but past is past. Still not late. Non diabetics generally question about a diabetic not taking care of oneself but what they dont know is that it isnt an easy job as they think. We are all here to help you. Please take care of yourself. My prayers are with you.

jayabee52
jayabee52 2014-08-06 17:12:39 -0500 Report

Howdy Daniel
Just to affirm what Silicone Eyes said. Get to an eye doc. How long has it been since you've been to the Opthamologist for a dialated retinal exam?

However I also want to caution you that if you get a pair of prescription lenses for your eyes and you haven't had your BG (blood glucose) levels under control for a month or so, you have wasted the exam and the lenses.

What happens in the eye of a PWD (person with diabetes) is that the high BG levels builds up slowly in the vitreous humor (aka the aqueous humor see ~ http://www.healthline.com/human-body-maps/vit...) the clear jell of the eyeball. Since there is no blood circulating in that clear part, it takes a while for the BG levels to come up and to go down. Higher glucose levels in your eyeball means more pressure in the eye and it changes the focus of the eye on the retina.

So unless you have a need to spend money needlessly, make sure your eyes have depressurized before the eye exam. Who knows? Perhaps your eyes may return to the proper focus again.

God's best to you

James

TLTanner
TLTanner 2014-08-06 17:21:51 -0500 Report

I understood too, that the high BG levels would also cause swelling of the optic nerve and thereby causing problems with focusing. I had that problem before and you're right, James, it makes for a needless eye exam other than to let you know that the cause of you bad vision is diabetes related.

Teresa

Silicone eyes
Silicone eyes 2014-08-06 16:28:05 -0500 Report

Your vision can change as your sugars are higher or lower. Get into the eye doc and have your eyes looked at. Test your BS often, get your A1C down to at least 7. I was just like you once, nobody likes to hear that or believe it, I didn't when people told me. I have one working eye and the other is limited. Eye problems can be avoided or at least minimized with good control, and control starts with testing, not guessing. The annoyance of a few fingerpricks a day is far less annoying than hoping you get some vision back after surgery or learning Braille. You are young enough that you can get some decent control and avoid, or like I said minimize, complications.If eye complications have started, there are several treatments that can help slow it down and avoid surgery or vision loss. Get in to the eye doc and good luck, let us know how it goes.