THIS NEW FINDING ABOUT MANGOES AND DIABETICS!

nzingha
By nzingha Latest Reply 2014-07-14 12:13:36 -0500
Started 2014-07-13 12:59:40 -0500

I HAVE BEEN READING THAT MANGOES ARE NOW GOOD FOR PEOPLE WITH DIABETES. How true is this and how much is enough?


7 replies

rolly123
rolly123 2014-07-13 23:13:59 -0500 Report

I love mangoes I eat one everyday since I been in fl up north they r expensive Steve good stuff on them type Lou says they high in carbs they still good

jayabee52
jayabee52 2014-07-13 17:08:05 -0500 Report

From what I've read the "finding" is from an animal study from Univ of Oklahoma as recently (2014) presented at Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB), Also a 2006 study from Australia showed some positive properties of Mangoes as well.

I read several reports from Google to determine this which you may find here ~ https://www.google.com/search?q=mango+and+dia...

Some of these reports are showing the newer information, and even the titles show a little hype, and others are more dated (2013) and conservative.

God's best to you and yours.

James

neverlowbg
neverlowbg 2014-07-13 16:11:39 -0500 Report

Mango is also high in fiber but also high in carbs good vitamins in the fruit too, but they are delicious I don't get them very often as goto go into city to get them but every once in a while mmmmmm

Type1Lou
Type1Lou 2014-07-13 15:26:32 -0500 Report

Mango is a pretty high-carb fruit at 35 grams each. What is it about mangoes that make them "good" for diabetics? Do you have a source you can direct us to?

haoleboy
haoleboy 2014-07-13 16:56:36 -0500 Report

As a long time resident of Hawaii that had a Haden Mango tree in the back yard … I am hoping this is true but …

There have been several animal studies that suggested a benefit for blood glucose control as well as improving decreasing insulin resistance. So far as I know only one small study done with humans-

twenty obese adults — 11 men and 9 women — with 10 grams of freeze-dried mango (equivalent to approximately 100 grams, or one half, of a fresh mango) each day for 12 weeks.

At the end of the study period, the researchers found that the participants’ blood glucose levels had been significantly reduced compared to at the start of the study. There wasn’t any substantial change among body composition in either the men or the women, but body-mass index (a measure of a person’s weight in relation to his height) had increased in women, on average.

According to lead author Edralin Lucas, PhD, “The results of this study support what we learned in our recent animal model, which found that mango improved blood glucose in mice fed a high-fat diet. Although the mechanism by which mango exerts its effects warrants further investigation, we do know that mangoes contain a complex mixture of polyphenolic compounds. Research has shown that several other plants and their polyphenolic compounds…have a positive effect on [fat] tissue.”

Steve

Type1Lou
Type1Lou 2014-07-14 07:51:46 -0500 Report

Thanks for the insight Steve! A man I dated, pre-hubby #2, was a big advocate of consuming foods high in bioflavinoids…and he is now a healthy 89 years old. So many of our medicines are derived from plants. It's not surprising that many have beneficial effects.