Okra to help with Blood Glucose

Adee5
By Adee5 Latest Reply 2014-02-05 19:23:49 -0600
Started 2014-01-30 12:14:34 -0600

I've discovered and been doing a lot of research with the vegetable okra helping to maintain and even lower blood glucose. We are supposed to cut the bottoms off 2 okra "fingers," slit down the middle and let soak in room temperature water overnight. Drinking the water in the morning (30 min prior to eating/drinking) supposed to help with glucose not being absorbed. Apparently it's the fiber in the "slime" the vegetable puts into the water.

Has anyone else heard of this or tried it? My BG is very well under control and know that I should discuss this with my doctor and not substitute this finding with my current medication.. But am very very curious..

Tags: blood sugar

47 replies

jigsaw
jigsaw 2014-02-03 14:53:32 -0600 Report

Here is some info concerning the origins of okra curing diabetes.
http://www.snopes.com/medical/homecure/okra.asp

Gabby
GabbyPA 2014-02-05 09:41:34 -0600 Report

As encouraging as this sounds, Snopes is one of my "don't trust" sites. But even they get it right sometimes. I may just have to buy some okra and give this a try. Put things to rest, at least for me.

jigsaw
jigsaw 2014-02-05 16:16:44 -0600 Report

Definitely a few people trying it out. If you come across a worthwhile recipe, let me know. Even if it helps blood glucose, I doubt if it will be earth shattering. I have found cinnamon, Aloe, and vinegar to have what appears to be mild stabilizing effects on blood sugar. I wouldn't bet my life on it though, and I have read some negatives about them also. Bottom line, I still have to take my medication. No fantastic home remedies so far.

Nick1962
Nick1962 2014-02-04 09:15:02 -0600 Report

Nice, they even underline the word “MAY” as in “might or might not”. As the article states, if there were some validity to the okra juice, some pharmaceutical company would have already learned to extract or synthesize it for this use.

You know what’s coming next right? Somewhere, someone will think if two okra “fingers” works, then 100 must be better and end up pressing a batch of okra wine. Not really sure how the body would react to that.

jigsaw
jigsaw 2014-02-04 18:51:40 -0600 Report

If the wine has promising effects, I'm immediately starting a winery! Just wondering, does okra grow in NC? On second thought, I retract that idea, after all, who would enjoy a glass of slimy wine?

Chopstix
Chopstix 2014-02-05 15:20:36 -0600 Report

Being a former soldier and truck driver I have found that some people will eat/drink just about anything…

jigsaw
jigsaw 2014-02-05 19:23:49 -0600 Report

You are definitely correct! Unfortunately, many people have no idea what's in the ingredients of the foods they think they're familiar with also!

jigsaw
jigsaw 2014-02-05 08:56:11 -0600 Report

Actually, I haven't tried either of them. Once I hear about people drinking fish roe and salmon smoothies with a bit of raw clam mixed in, I'll probably give it a shot! Until then, I'll stick with my strawberry and blueberry smoothies, mixed in my super Ninja. Absolutely delicious, and healthy with fiber, and low glycemic fruit. Thick and creamy also, with absolutely 0% slime.

Nick1962
Nick1962 2014-02-05 10:45:20 -0600 Report

That's one smoothie I'll not be asking you to share! Have heard of folks adding fish oil though. You can have my portion of that as well.

Adee5
Adee5 2014-02-03 11:42:26 -0600 Report

Gabby,

I so agree. I am not asking anyone to try this. My problem with Just Joyce's comments is she's making it seem as if I'm standing on a mountain top proclaiming this miracle vegetable will cure diabetes! That was not my statement! As a matter of fact, I did not make a statement, I ASKED 2 questions. Whether anyone else heard of this, and whether anyone has tried it with positive results! I have purchased some okra and will try this for myself. I will try it in the water, and I will try it eating it whole. If I have anything to report, whether positive or negative, I will post it. Because I do post it does not mean it will be a success or failure for everyone else. Everyone's comments on this post has truly been helpful. One of the things I've looked for on this site is motivation. I assure you, I am motivated..

Gabby
GabbyPA 2014-02-05 09:46:11 -0600 Report

Jigsaw found an article on it on Snopes. Who knows if it works. No one, unless we try it. I guess because it sounds kind of gross, we avoid it. But to be honest, how gross is it that we put drugs in our bodies? At least okra is a food. Meant to be consumed...slime and all. LOL

Gabby
GabbyPA 2014-02-02 11:01:43 -0600 Report

Interesting, because you are the second person to post something on it in the last week. For the cost of some okra, why not try it and see what it does? Or more so, how does it taste? Who it brave enough to try it and report?

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2014-02-02 13:00:53 -0600 Report

Count me out, I don't like okra and we as lay people can say it works but without clinical trials and detailed research studies we have done nothing of scientific value.

To be proven factual and accurate, the study would have to be down by an accredited research facility that has the ability to do the research in a controlled manner.

I don't understand why you would advocate anyone doing this when you know there is no proof it actually works.

Gabby
GabbyPA 2014-02-03 08:17:54 -0600 Report

Because there is no proof that it doesn't.

To be honest, a clinical study doesn't mean it will work for me. Only trying it myself will let me know if it will work for me.You give far too much credit to the Alphabet Agencies and not enough to your own body. I trust the FDA about as far as I can throw them, and getting something healing from foods is far more beneficial than a pill or a shot.

Number one being, there is no prescription required to obtain it and it is then available to the masses and not just the ones who have money to buy doctor opinions and pills.

As okra is not something that you can OD on or that will cause a third eye to appear on your forehead (or any number of the side effects that FDA approved drugs offer)...who knows. Why not try it? The worst it can do is make you gag on okra slime. The best it can do is make your levels better. What is the problem with trying it out?

theladyiscrazy
theladyiscrazy 2014-02-02 15:02:47 -0600 Report

Just Joyce,

You do realize that some meds came about not through scientific studies, right? The dosage for children for antibiotics is one such thing. There was not a "scientific study or clinical trial" that was done. Many meds utilized in children medicine in particular were done via trial and error. Another thing is a med created for one ailment that later is found to help people who suffer from another ailment. How does that happen, well a person with condition 1 and 2 is given a drug for condition 1, but condition 2 improves as well or instead of. That is why you see things like Humana being prescribed for more than what it originally came out for. Did they go into trials initially to test multiple things? Sometimes results, even in scientific studies,or objective (cholesterol studies often were in this latter category).

The other thing is NO ONE here stated it worked. The question was had anyone heard about it and if anyone knew if it was accurate or not. There are things that were created in nature that help (or harm) us and it doesn't take a scientist to figure it out. Grandma had home remedies that actually work and that science is now going back and proving she knew what she was talking about. (chicken soup anyone)

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2014-02-02 15:45:29 -0600 Report

I know this but do you think that this is going to happen today? Do you think the public is going to allow someone to cook something up in their kitchen claim it does something without the FDA, AMA, Dept. of Agriculture and everyone else first studying it?

There are a wide variety of medications that were meant for one thing but is found to help another. They do this because of research and because some doctor has a patient that found a medication helped with something else.

I agree just about everyone over the age of 40 was treated with grandmas home remedies.

What I am saying is do not defend something that is not proven or accurate. If you want to know if something works, try it out and find out. Pay attention to what you are reading.

I agree with you that research can and cannot be objective. What they are looking for is a medication that will cure, prevent a medical problem or maintain/correct the problem. They do this with research and clinical trials and then you see that it is a proven study. Even then the results do not benefit everyone with the medical condition.

My question to you is this, if Adee found out that it worked would you try something someone cooked up in their kitchen and said it worked?

theladyiscrazy
theladyiscrazy 2014-02-02 16:47:10 -0600 Report

Okra, NO. However, I do use certain spices that have been touted to help with health. Many things have been studied in the Natural/Alternative medicine field but are not backed by FDA. The reason, you can't patent something that occurs in Nature on its own.

Even drugs that are "approved" with scientific studies behind them are being pulled all the time for health risks and issues that "the scientific studies" didn't show. Why? Because there is such a push to get a med to the market as fast as they can, that often long term studies have not been completed. Worse still, are meds prescribed to children before they are aware of side effects, especially unique side effects that a child may have yet an adult wouldn't.

I am not advocating for trying something "unproven". However, I do not see the harm in reading about something and coming her to ask if anyone else had heard of it and if anyone had tried it. The same would be if I came here and asked if anyone had tried a certain med and if it worked for them or not. It is not a replacement for medical information BUT rather educating oneself on ALL possibilities.

AGAIN, no one asked someone to do this in lieu of what medical professionals had told them.

Adee5
Adee5 2014-02-02 14:01:21 -0600 Report

Just Joyce,

What you need to understand is this: at NO TIME have I advocated this issue. None of my posts or responses are directing or informing anyone that okra is finally a cure all. What my posts asks is if anyone else heard of this and whether anyone has tried it with positive results. I don't like or appreciate you suggesting or making it seem as if I am prescribing okra as a solution to diabetes! I don't understand why your making it seem like I am pushing this on the Diabetic Connect community. I appreciate all your and everyone's input, but please don't make it seem as if I'm advocating anything. I am not a doctor or a scientist. I am just looking, like so many others here, for answers, help and motivation.

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2014-02-02 15:47:37 -0600 Report

Then why don't you try it and see if it works? That is the only way you will find out if it works and just because it works for you it may not work for others. Did you read the post from James about this very same conversation we had last week? If you do that you will find even more responses to the very same topic.

Adee5
Adee5 2014-02-02 15:54:01 -0600 Report

Joyce,

If I knew there was a post previously mentioned regarding the same topic, I assure you, I wouldn't have mentioned it again. You're interpretation of my post is inaccurate to say the least.

theladyiscrazy
theladyiscrazy 2014-02-02 10:47:12 -0600 Report

I hate okra because of its sliminess. There is no way I will drink the slime. BLAH.

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2014-02-02 12:46:00 -0600 Report

Thelady, my mother cooked okra all the time and there is a way to do it so it isn't slimy. I don't like it at all so I never paid attention to how she did it.

MsQueenie
MsQueenie 2014-02-02 05:40:39 -0600 Report

You know, I wouldn't be in such a rush to believe this because there hasn't been any clinical trials. Actually at the bottom of the issue it had last updated 28 January 2014 and under that was Urban Legends Reference Pages 1995-2014 by snopes.com (go figure).

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2014-02-02 12:56:55 -0600 Report

MsQueenie this started on Facebook and a doctor wrote an article on it. For some reason two different people have posted on here thinking it was real. The first thing I did was research the person who wrote the article. He is a medical doctor but he has not done a study so this is bogus information.

MsQueenie
MsQueenie 2014-02-02 15:11:33 -0600 Report

Just Joyce, I do know that a doctor started the saying, but if you noticed what I said, I said there hasn't been any clinical trials and I also said that it was noted, not originated in the Urban Legends Reference pages, or that was what I meant, Sorry for the misunderstanding. I do agree with Glucerna, haoleboy, and you, I'm not disputing it. also in the article it was said that soluble fiber as in okra and other foods forms a gel inside the bowels that slows down the absorption of food from the gut, evening out the peaks in blood glucose that occurs after meals. Soluble fiber also draws in bile acids that contribute to raised cholesterol, allowing the body to pass the acids out of the system instead of reabsorbing them into the blood. So soluble fiber offers the double potential benefits of lowering cholesterol and possibly reducing progression to diabetes. All in all I believe that eating okra along with other soluble fibers may improve the state of diabetes and make it more bearable for the diabetic. My home nurse always say before she leave, " eat lots of fiber and load up on the beans". I say "I will" and I do.

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2014-02-02 15:51:36 -0600 Report

I agree with you. I read the article and several others on this topic.

Researching requires finding the original source of the information. A doctor talked about that was basically the gist of it.

Everything I have read about soluble fiber requires that you eat the foods high in soluble fiber.

meadowrose
meadowrose 2014-02-01 20:26:53 -0600 Report

If it was left up to okra being the thing to control my blood sugar, I would be toasted, as I unequivocally cannot stand okra.

Adee5
Adee5 2014-02-01 15:12:39 -0600 Report

Isn't that what research is? Looking for facts to prove or disprove a particular subject? Goofy or not, there is some relevance with the actual consumption of okra providing the soluble fiber that can help prevent the absorption of glucose. It's research, I'm on a truth/fact finding mission. This is why I turned to the group.. Thank you for your input, Just Joyce…

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2014-02-02 12:52:18 -0600 Report

Yes research is finding facts to prove or disprove something but you are trying to defend something with no merit.

If you read what everyone who read the article you will see that is was updated Jan 28 of this year and there has not been any clinical trials. This actually started on facebook earlier this year.

The person who did this does not have any scientific information to back up the claim. It may or may not have worked for them. No one knows.

You are on a futile mission because there is absolutely nothing to back this up so why waste your time and if you are not in a setting to do the scientific research what is the point?

Adee5
Adee5 2014-02-02 14:04:40 -0600 Report

Defend? I defend nothing, Just Joyce. Nothing at all. I don't understand how a question turned into a debate.

Adee5
Adee5 2014-02-01 14:51:14 -0600 Report

Thank you for your response Just Joyce. I don't want you or anyone to think I'm advocating this as fact. I was curious if anyone else had heard this, and even more curious if anyone has tried this with positive results. Research is research.. and more often than not takes us in complete circles with little or no answers. This is why I turned to this group to see if we, as real people, can shed any light into this subject. Anything that will help me with better control (not a cure, although, God willing, one will be available one day) is worth looking into. I still am doing research on this subject, however, I'm not advocating it, trying it, or substituting what I have read for my medication.

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2014-02-02 12:55:06 -0600 Report

In a sense you are advocating it because everyone has told you there is nothing to back this up. You are not going to find research on something that has had no clinical trials to prove or disprove it. This is simply something that started on Facebook and I don't beleive anyting I read on Facebook as being FACTUAL and I don't believe research that has not been proven through the use of clinical trials.

Gabby
GabbyPA 2014-02-02 11:04:55 -0600 Report

Yes, I agree. There are all kinds of natural elements out there that have been forgotten or just "take too long" for our instant gratification society. I have found that herbs are very helpful and that food is just as much our friend as our enemy depending on what we choose.

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2014-02-01 14:18:33 -0600 Report

The key word is that it was MENTIONED in the New England Journal of Medicine. In looking at this no where does it say this is acually a FACT. I agree with haoleboy, Glucerna and Iron Ore. This actually started on Facebook earlier this year.

The consumption of okra can "help even out roller coaster blood sugar levels" and MAY contribute to preventing the onset of diabetes or ameleriorating symptoms in those who are already diabetic. But even claiming that much for okra is somewhat speculative, and it does not mean that regularly drinking okra water will "cure" diabetes or make diabetes "go away," nor that okra is a proven viable substitute for insulin injections. As noted in the 2012 textbook Bioactive Food as Dietary Interventions for Diabetes:
Read more at http://www.snopes.com/medical/homecure/okra.a...

As Iron Ore said is that this is goofy. I totally agree with that. The benfit from okra comes from EATING it, not drinking the water. Think about it, if this were actually true, it would NOT be MENTIONED in the New England Journal of Medicine, every diabetic on the planet would know it.

Words in information like this such as mentioned, could, would, might or may does not make it a fact. When doing research you have to look for "proven study", you also have to research the person who wrote the article.

haoleboy
haoleboy 2014-01-31 16:51:58 -0600 Report

my take away was that the benefit is from eating the vegetables as the positive affect is from the fiber which would be in greater abundance whole than just the water it is soaked in … but then I am not the brightest bulb in the candelabra.
my favorite way to eat okra is in vegetarian 'chili'. certainly frying it will diminish its health benefits.
http://goo.gl/LaKXJh

Glucerna
Glucerna 2014-01-31 16:24:34 -0600 Report

Interesting discussion. I like to use snopes.com to get more information on these types of questions. http://www.snopes.com/medical/homecure/okra.asp Basically, soluble fiber can lower blood sugar levels, and okra is a source of soluble fiber. There haven't been any clinical studies done on okra, which means the only answer we have to question right now is "we don't know". The fiber is present in the okra itself, so you wouldn't have to drink the 'slime' but rather could eat okra and get more soluble fiber. ~Lynn @Glucerna

Adee5
Adee5 2014-01-31 14:12:24 -0600 Report

@haoleboy, so my post is correct? I don't understand. My whole post was to ascertain if the soaking of okra will benefit diabetics by consuming the "slime" that is released into the water. My post was to ascertain whether anyone has tried this method. Many people do not enjoy eating okra without frying them or adding unhealthy or extra things to it. Thank you for citing the information, though. It was one of the items I've read while researching the okra in water claims.

Adee5
Adee5 2014-01-31 11:59:36 -0600 Report

It's been mentioned in the New England Journal of Medicine @IronOre. Been reading about it A LOT. Goofy? Maybe not in this case.

haoleboy
haoleboy 2014-01-31 12:54:27 -0600 Report

"A study in the New England Journal of Medicine shows that taking in extra soluble fiber helps to control diabetes. Now all diabetics should follow two dietary rules. First, they should restrict severely foods that cause a high rise in blood sugar: sugar-added foods such as soft drinks, pastries, cookies and so forth, all foods made from flour such as bakery products and pastas, and fruit juices. They should eat fruits and root vegetables such as potatoes only with meals, to slow the release of sugar from these foods without eliminating their valuable nutrients. The second rule for diabetics is to eat a the foods that contain soluble fiber. Foods rich is soluble fiber include most whole grains, oat bran and oat meal; beans and other seeds; many fruits, including cantaloupe, grapefruit, orange, papaya and raisins; and vegetables such as lima beans, okra and sweet potatoes. "
http://goo.gl/StCpov

IronOre
IronOre 2014-01-31 11:40:48 -0600 Report

Sounds goofy to me.
IMO "Don't believe everything you read on-line" certainly applies here.

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2014-02-01 14:22:33 -0600 Report

Iron I agree with you. This is way too goofy to believe. If this were factual, it would be something we all would know. This started on Facebook by some goofy person who fell for something someone told them.

People are so gullible. I bet I could sell ocean front property in Arizonia to some people. Never believe everything you read on-line. People are so busy using Dr. Google that they have lost the ability to ask themselves is this real. Great response.

One Step at a Time
One Step at a Time 2014-01-30 17:27:34 -0600 Report

I've also heard cinnamon can aid in lower blood sugar. I wonder if either are true…

jayabee52
jayabee52 2014-02-01 18:14:39 -0600 Report

That has been suggested to work as well, however in my experience it has not worked for me. (of course I took my cinnamon in a Cinnabon! LoL/jk)

Kidding aside, I tried the common grocery store cinnamon, the so called "true" cinnamon from Ceylon (cinnamonium Zeylonicum) as well as the cinnamon capsules with chromium I bought at Walmart. Nothing seemed to work for me.

Some have said that it works for them

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