Drug information

buffy360
By buffy360 Latest Reply 2013-12-11 04:29:07 -0600
Started 2013-12-06 17:25:16 -0600

Do ya'll know about consulting apps and websites like Medline, Drugs.com, NIH.org, MedHelp to learn about side effects. I find them very handy!

Keeping papers the pharmacy provides about new medications in a binder is handy. Write notes and questions or side effects for your Doctor and bring the binder to your next appointment (add some binder paper for extra notes) to remind you to get answers since Nurse should always should review all your meds at each appointment which gives your Dr an opportunity to do any necessary tweaking. And you'll feel better for more clarity.

I have found this also helps me at the pharmacy making sure to always review my refills are correct before I leave the store. Often they change brands and substitute genetics which can have dyes and preservatives. People can be sensitive to them. Some of my meds have to be "brand-specific" written in the prescriptions. I have ADHD and have been told I ask a lot of questions, but how else to learn!


5 replies

buffy360
buffy360 2013-12-08 15:17:14 -0600 Report

Forgot to include WebMD. I am not advocating 100% accuracy, but that we have many resources including our pharmacists to gain knowledge of what medicines offer and side effects. The ones I listed are only a few I have found helpful. I do advocate to keep asking questions.

Gabby
GabbyPA 2013-12-08 11:37:57 -0600 Report

Keep that ADHD going when it comes to your health!!

I use WebMD a lot and have found out interactions on my own not only with other meds, but with foods. I never thought about checking on the dyes the put in the drugs. That is getting down to the nitty gritty for sure.

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2013-12-08 11:10:37 -0600 Report

I keep the papers for at least a month then toss them. I don't really need them. I prefer to speak with my pharmacists than consult a website. You don't know how accurate that information is. The problem with the internet is that is is turning people into doctors and pharmacist.