Get Professional Help

Dr John
By Dr John Latest Reply 2014-03-03 04:07:27 -0600
Started 2013-08-25 08:06:07 -0500

I've been reading this forum for several years. It is not intended for medical help. It is intended for emotional support. Many people on this forum unfortunately are not receiving professional help and should from professionals, not here. They should see an endocrinologist and a certified diabetes educator. The people in this forum should be recommending that they see an endocrinologist and certified diabetes educator, not giving medical advice.

John


8 replies

Debbiejf
Debbiejf 2014-03-03 04:07:27 -0600 Report

John…I have never seen anyone here give medical advice as to what or how much medicine they should be taking. Mostly it's just people sharing what meds they take and what works for them. Everyone is on board with suggesting to see doctors whether gp, pcp, endocronologists whatever. As far as members probably suggesting certain foods—eating better or exercising if and when possible…I don't think any of that is considered medical advice. I am one of the very fortunate ones with insurance that can see all necessary doctors but that hasn't always been the case. It's also very sad that the fact I was diagnosed with diabetes (2) 30 years ago that there was no communication about what it was, what kind of damage could/would happen from any doctor. Having to find out on my own and most of it in the last 10 years, I'm still learning and not from any doctor, why is that? I do have an endocronologist whom by the way hasn't really given me any more info than my pcp had.

Angie Type 1
Angie Type 1 2013-09-02 10:37:35 -0500 Report

Dr John, I am on board with Gabby. I've had diabetes for 24 years and to tell you the truth other than giving me the diagnosis and setting up my insulin dosages when I started on needles they have done minimal for my care. The Certified Diabetes Educator did most of the work and changed or tweaked my dosages. I am on the pump now and have been for a very long time and while I do go to my endocrinologist every 3 months..they make minor changes based on a "very brief" meeting and records of 2 prior weeks ???? and oftentimes don't even take the time to check my feet etc. Additionally, because they are always running late and far behind schedule they rush through and spend only 10 minutes or so. I am a Cash pay like Gabby because I have this pre-existing condition and work part-time so I'm not qualified for company insurance. This forum is to help with things that have worked for us and could work for others. But yes, they should ask their specialist or their primary care physician before changing their medications.

Angie Type 1
Angie Type 1 2013-09-02 10:13:54 -0500 Report

Dr John, I am on board with Gabby. I've had diabetes for 24 years and to tell you the truth other than giving me the diagnosis and setting up my insulin dosages when I started on needles they have done minimal and I was going to for my care. The Certified Diabetes Educator did most of the work and changed or tweaked my dosages. I am on the pump now and have been for a very long time and while I do go to my endocrinologist every 3 months..they make minor changes based on a "very brief" meeting and records of 2 prior weeks ???? and oftentimes done't even take the time to check my feet etc. Additionally, because they are always running late and far behind schedule they rush through and spend only 10 minutes or so. I am a Cash pay like Gabby because I have this pre-existing condition and work part-time so I'm not qualified for company insurance. This forum is to help and give advice to what works for us and could work for others. But yes, they should ask their specialist or their primary care physician before changing their medications but Dr.'s don't always get it right either.

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2013-09-02 09:55:31 -0500 Report

I agree with you wholeheartedly. No one should ever take medical advice from anyone who isn't a part of their medical team. This could cause someone harm or death. People should always call their doctors.

Gabby
GabbyPA 2013-08-28 20:41:21 -0500 Report

I agree to a degree. We are not doctors, that is true. What we share are things that have worked for us or people we know. It is not medical advice, but anticdotical observations, which can be quite powerful.

However, I will be honest. I learn WAY more here than from my doctor. I learned a lot of great things from the TCOYD classes I took (and should take again). But the folks here are light years ahead of my doctor. If he would be more open minded, he might learn a thing or two from me. It took him over a year of bugging him to get him to check my feet. And he was rather upset when I went to my podiatrist for a second opinion. The reading materials he gave me for diabetes are so old that even the ADA would laugh. It is pathetic.

And as for going to an endocrinologist, none of them in my area will take cash. Yep, you heard me right. If I am not insured, they will not take me, even if I would pay cash for my visits. So once again, I come here.

Just Joyce
Just Joyce 2013-09-02 10:13:16 -0500 Report

Gabby, I don't have medical insurance and have never had a doctor turn down cash. I don't agree with your medical advice statement. The person with the high BS reading was told by you to drink lots of water and take any meds given by his doctor. You actually gave medical advice rather than tell him to contact his doctor. Never ever give medical advice for several reasons:
A. You are not a doctor and are treating the patient.
B. You have no information if what is written is accurate
C. You are not treating the person so you don't know the medical history of the person
D. If you give a person medical advice and the person uses that information and gets ill, you can be sued.

If a person asks for medical advice such as how much insulin they should be taking or what medication they should be taking, are questions they MUST ask their DOCTOR, not someone who has no idea what the doctor has prescribed for them let alone the dosage. If you don't have a doctor you can go to the ER. You will get a bill but you are in the hands of people trained to assist you and not talking to someone online playing at being a doctor. What works for one person may not benefit or even help the person asking for the advice.

We transported a woman who told her husband she had chest pains. He told her to take one of his nitro pills. She did and had a severe reaction to it. Perplexed us until he told us what she did and found out she took 3. He immediately called 911 when she fainted. Turned out she had severe indigestion. Had he taken her to the ER or called her doctor she would have been fine instead of ending up in ICU. Which is why you don't give medical advice.

lorider70
lorider70 2013-08-28 15:19:46 -0500 Report

I agree; but not everyone has the means to pay for these "extra services". In some cases money and/or insurance are the problem; in other cases some are locked into one medical provider organization, again due to insurance/financial constraints. These people then seek answers/suggestions where they can find them, and find themselves deluged with advice and suggestions that rarely if ever agree. Others are so overwhelmed by their diagnosis that they are desparate to find answers anywhere they can, in hopes that they will find that magical advice that will make everything OK again. In my 25 years as a type II, I have dealt with several in the medical profession as well as other diabetics that do not take this disease as seriously as they should .The popular concensus seems to be medicate, diet, and exercise will solve everything…I am here to tell you that they will sometimes, sometimes NOT; and ofter they will, but only for a while.

hairbear68
hairbear68 2013-08-28 15:31:54 -0500 Report

I don't think its always insurance but the policy book keeper doing some f this damage one minute you can get the shoe the next minute you can't can shoes or glasses and most ppl I've talked too get medical but it doen't cover dentist …ect…

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