Sugar high and lows

karen7t2
By karen7t2 Latest Reply 2013-06-20 13:18:46 -0500
Started 2013-06-09 17:36:05 -0500

I am just wondering if whenever I have a sugar high (I never had a low yet) does it damage my kidneys?


24 replies

01misspearl
01misspearl 2013-06-19 19:23:45 -0500 Report

My endo told me that when my levels spike to drink ice water.
It increase your metabolism because your body has to warm the water
Any increase in metabolism lowers your bg's
Maybe you should ask your doctor I do not take insulin. So I don't know if this will work for you but it helps me a lot ice water a walk. Good luck

Type1Lou
Type1Lou 2013-06-14 16:13:26 -0500 Report

In the US, we measure BG by mg/dl while many (most?) other countries measure BG's using mmol (the numbers with the decimal) My meter can be programmed for either scale but I use the mg/dl since I'm in the US.

Here is a link to convert BG's from one type to the other (http://www.diabeticconnect.com/news-articles/...;) I found it in an article posted here by Mays (Thanks Mays!…the article is at http://www.diabeticconnect.com/diabetes-news/...;) For example, a 4.2 mmol would convert to around a 75 mg/dl…hope this helps…no need to do any math…just plug in the number and select whether you're converting from mg/dl to mmol or from mmol to mg/dl and presto, it gives you the converted value

An occasional high may not imperil your health but prolonged and frequent high BG's may create damaging complications to many organs including your kidneys and your eyes. It's a real incentive for me to try to keep them in control. I would advise you to work on getting your A1c lower. A1c's in the 6's indicate good control while in the 7's indicate fair control. I suspect yours are higher. One way to lower BG's and get better A1c's that worked for me was to seriously cut back on all of the carbohydrates I was eating. I now limit myself to no more than 120 grams of carb per day. I've become a fanatic food label reader, looking at both serving sizes and total carbs per serving. It works. My last A1c was 6.7.

Gwen214
Gwen214 2013-06-13 18:53:09 -0500 Report

I've been told anything over 140 starts any kind of damage. But the number can be different for everyone.

karen7t2
karen7t2 2013-06-11 13:24:24 -0500 Report

Thanks everyone for your replies. I am not totally sure how you get your reading 180 etc. My readings are usually 9.3 to 10.9, always with a decimal. How do you get the other readings. I been given them from my Dr. but I don't think my meter reads this type

IronOre
IronOre 2013-06-11 21:39:42 -0500 Report

It's just a units thing.
Somebody on here told us what the conversion was, but I forgot what it is.
Where are you located ?
For you 7.0 or less is good.

jigsaw
jigsaw 2013-06-10 16:30:07 -0500 Report

A blood glucose level of 180 or above is known as the kidney threshold. This is the point where kidney damage can begin to occur. How long, how high and how frequently that your readings go high is a factor. Even those with diabetes that keep their blood glucose well controlled have occasional high readings and blood sugar spikes.
I have had diabetes for 20 years, and I can assure you that I have had occasional hi readings. Most importantly, I keep tight control on my blood glucose in general and maintain a good a1c level. I have not experienced any complications resulting from diabetes at all.
I would say get as informed as much as possible, keep tight control of your blood glucose keep an eye on your a1c, and go enjoy life!

JoleneAL
JoleneAL 2013-06-10 08:43:44 -0500 Report

My doctor assured me that going high on occasion happens, it is when we stay high for years on end that damage starts. I have met people who are such panic freaks that if they go one point over 140, they imagine their kidneys shutting down within hours. All I can do is the best with what I have (tools wise) and live. I refuse to succumb to the thoughts that 141 is going to massively kill off all my internal organs. I go to 200 daily due to my morning spikes. Insulin brings it down and I move on. As for getting a high down without insulin, go take a walk. A stroll, not a power walk if you're not use to it.

IronOre
IronOre 2013-06-10 12:24:18 -0500 Report

You are so correct. Sometimes I feel the stress caused by someone thinking their organs are getting damaged are worse than diabetes itself.

JoleneAL
JoleneAL 2013-06-11 10:30:24 -0500 Report

Reading what I wrote today, I sounded mean! I did not mean to. I had to leave DB for a period of time after I was first diagnosed because I was starting to have panic attacks from to high readings and people saying I was killing off my kidneys at every high. I went a year after diagnosis with readings in the 200s and it wasn't until I asked for (and got) insulin was I able to keep them down toward normal. Panic attacks are worse than a glucose high.

IronOre
IronOre 2013-06-11 21:42:20 -0500 Report

I just reread what you wrote above. I lessened my morning spikes by adding more protein (in my case; yogurt) to my breakfast.
As far as sounding mean . . . not that I could tell.

IronOre
IronOre 2013-06-09 19:55:02 -0500 Report

The damage comes when you do it constantly; over and over again.
If you are high just bring it down as soon as you can.
Do you know how to bring it down when you go high ?

karen7t2
karen7t2 2013-06-10 03:53:50 -0500 Report

Thanks and no, I do not know how to bring it down other than being really careful with my diet.

IronOre
IronOre 2013-06-10 19:34:43 -0500 Report

Type 1 diabetics can lower their BS easier than type 2's and I guess I thought that's what you were. They simply take insulin based on what their BS reading is.

IronOre
IronOre 2013-06-10 19:34:36 -0500 Report

Type 1 diabetics can lower their BS easier than type 2's and I guess I thought that's what you were. They simply take insulin based on what their BS reading is.

Set apart
Set apart 2013-06-15 07:09:49 -0500 Report

Hi Iron Ore, as a T1 sometimes out of the blue I will spike in the middle of the night, like up to 197BG, with insulin I have to be careful not to drop too low since I am really sensitive to novolog. How do you suggest taking care of this without risking a low, I will take like 2-3 units and then have to monitor the rest of the night. Any other suggestions would help. Thanks

IronOre
IronOre 2013-06-15 12:33:42 -0500 Report

Are you on Lantus or Levimer too ? If so when do you take it ? more later . . . I have things to do

Graylin Bee
Graylin Bee 2013-06-09 18:13:51 -0500 Report

Experts differ. Some say over 180 can start causing damage. Some say anything over 140. Then they also say it depends how long it is over the numbers and how often.

Nshawk4
Nshawk4 2013-06-20 13:18:46 -0500 Report

This really worries me as my average over the past six weeks (when I learned I was diabetic) has been 150. I started with one Metforman in the mornings, but two weeks ago the doctor put me on two a day one in the morning and one at night. I use My Fitness Pal to record everything going in my mouth. Feel I am eating right keeping carbs low and fat low. Stopped all sweets and cannot figure what I am doing wrong. Thank goodness I start a Diabetes Education class today! Hoping I can get some answers. Everything I read is what to do when you are low, not so much on what to do when high.

Nshawk4
Nshawk4 2013-06-20 13:18:45 -0500 Report

This really worries me as my average over the past six weeks (when I learned I was diabetic) has been 150. I started with one Metforman in the mornings, but two weeks ago the doctor put me on two a day one in the morning and one at night. I use My Fitness Pal to record everything going in my mouth. Feel I am eating right keeping carbs low and fat low. Stopped all sweets and cannot figure what I am doing wrong. Thank goodness I start a Diabetes Education class today! Hoping I can get some answers. Everything I read is what to do when you are low, not so much on what to do when high.

karen7t2
karen7t2 2013-06-10 03:55:51 -0500 Report

This worries me because I don't knowhow long I may have been diabetic before being diagnosed..

Graylin Bee
Graylin Bee 2013-06-10 08:37:56 -0500 Report

I have wondered that as well. But it seems that some of the problems I had during the time I was fighting MRSA and my BG was high enough that the nice hospital people told me I have diabetes and were testing my BG and giving me insulin seems better now after three years.
Would be a good question to ask your Doctors. My eye Doctor has told me each eye exam he sees no diabetic related damage. My vascular surgeon said my vascular problem was not due to diabetes. The podiatrist who saw me once while I was in the hospital seemed surprised I did not have any loss of feeling in my toes. My wound care doctor didn't think my healing was slowed due to the diabetes. I don't remember exactly what the other 10 or more doctors who were involved with my treatment in the year of surgeries discussed about the diabetes factor with me. I know they really checked out my heart and found no damage. My PCP has not mentioned any problems after I was released from the hospital and he had reviewed all the test info.
Oh, I would not recommend a near death by MRSA experience as a way to get things checked out. I would have preferred calmly asking if there were any tests that could be run to check how various body parts were functioning.