Hypothermia and Diabetes

tmana
By tmana Latest Reply 2014-11-22 10:51:56 -0600
Started 2008-05-21 01:23:25 -0500

Has anyone else experienced episodes of borderline hypothermia after diagnosis with diabetes? If so, are you noticing a drop or a rise in blood glucose level during, and following, the hypothermic events?

Also, eliminating environmental stresses, can someone tell me what are the usual primary causes of hypothermia?


8 replies

Mikey1988
Mikey1988 2014-11-22 10:51:56 -0600 Report

Im type 1 and having problems with internal body temp. I was having heart pain, arrythmias, and svt but external body temp normal so i didnt feel cold, yet my temps were running under 95. Seems like dysautonomia, and type 1 diabetes is autoimmune, anyone else having problems with internal body temp?

jupton1
jupton1 2008-05-21 02:45:31 -0500 Report

The incidence of admissions of patients with hypothermia was determined to examine whether hypothermia was more common in elderly patients with diabetes than in the general population after diabetic metabolic emergency cases had been excluded. A prospective survey of three accident and emergency departments identified 134 cases of hypothermia admitted from a catchment population of almost 157,000 aged 65 or over during the winters of 1981-2 to 1983-4. The predicted number of patients with diabetes in the population was nearly 5600 (3.5%). Twenty three admissions for hypothermia (17%) occurred in 20 patients with previously diagnosed diabetes. Women made up 87% of the diabetic admissions; the ratio of diabetic to non-diabetic admission rates in women was 7.9 (95% confidence interval 5.3 to 12.0). After excluding diabetic metabolic emergency admissions the ratio was 6.4. The ratio in men was 2.4, but the small number of admissions produced wide confidence intervals. Ten of the admissions with diabetes (43%) had pathological disorders that are associated with an increased risk of hypothermia. The frequency of these conditions is higher in patients with diabetes than in the general population and partly explains the increased risk of hypothermia in these patients.

tmana
tmana 2008-05-21 08:22:30 -0500 Report

That might be useful for me if I were over 65 …

Seriously, though, I've had a long history of feeling "inappropriately" chilled, and it seems to have been getting worse, in spurts, since diagnosis. Because I'm not registering hypoglycemic during hypothermic events — and I'm registering hyperglycemic in the aftermath — I'm not sure that whatever is driving the hypothermia is not also the driving factor for the diabetes.

Wintergrean
Wintergrean 2012-01-18 14:49:59 -0600 Report

Did you ever get a decent response? I am having the same problem. I am 36.

tmana
tmana 2012-01-30 10:53:56 -0600 Report

Nope. The only thing is, it's gotten worse over time. Last year I'd gotten to the point of convulsive shivering at work, because it was so cold, and sometimes complete numbness in the extremities. It's not consistent where and when it pops up, and the best my doctor can figure is that I have nonautoimmune Raynaud's…

laddiesgirl
laddiesgirl 2012-02-27 10:44:09 -0600 Report

I have the same issue. I was diagnosed with Type 1 in 1998 and am 48 years old. I walked the dog this morning and it was chilly and I have experienced worse. However, I am now at work for 2 plus hours, wrapped in 2 blankets and cannot get warm. I am not shivering, but my body feels chilled and I cannot get back into normal warmth. The only other thing I can think of is that my body temperature tends to run low anyway — typically 96.8 to 97.2. If anyone has more information, I would be very interested.

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