My Gluten and Dairy Tests

Dr John
By Dr John Latest Reply 2012-12-13 19:54:17 -0600
Started 2012-12-11 13:07:24 -0600

Gluten (wheat, kamut, spelt, barley, rye, and triticale) and dairy may not be suitable for individuals with autoimmune disorders such as type 1 diabetes. Gluten and dairy in individuals with autoimmune disorder can inhibit the absorption of cysteine. Cysteine is an amino acid that is the precursor to glutathione, a powerful antioxidant. There are also immune reactions to gluten and dairy among many people. It is wise to try a gluten and dairy free diet.

The Gluten Test
The first step is to measure blood glucose levels 2 hours after meals while avoiding all gluten products for 4 days. Re-introduce a gluten product, such as wheat, containing the same amount of carbohydrates, during a specific meal. Measure the blood glucose level after 2 hours. Compare the readings with and without gluten. Repeat this process several times. Blood glucose meters can be purchased at local pharmacies.

The Dairy Test
The first step is to measure blood glucose levels 2 hours after meals while avoiding all dairy products for 4 days. Re-introduce a dairy product, such as milk during a specific meal. Measure the blood glucose level after 2 hours. Compare the readings with and without dairy. Repeat this process several times. Blood glucose meters can be purchased at local pharmacies.


9 replies

Triskit
Triskit 2012-12-13 19:54:17 -0600 Report

I eat a gluten and dairy free diet but I also have celiac disease among other auto-immune diseases… Anyhow, I always struggled to have good control no matter how hard I worked at it, until I got diagnosed with Celiac and went off gluten. I was gluten free for about 6yrs when I also decided to go off dairy and my overall health and A1c have never been better.

granniesophie
granniesophie 2012-12-11 16:46:19 -0600 Report

My BG are much better without gluten, but I also went to Lantus about the same time, so I attributed the lower numbers to that, never thinking it could be from being gluten free! Wow!!

This is one test I won't be doing, being absolutely terrified of eating anything with gluten in it. I am just now getting rid of the feeling of a horse kicking it's way out of me, and never, ever want to feel that way again-and I still do when I inadvertantly get hold of something with hidden gluten. I would not purposely subject myself to a test that involves eating gluten EVER again!!!

Caroltoo
Caroltoo 2012-12-12 02:21:13 -0600 Report

Graylin, I have sure found it to be a very important discovery for me. Like Sonya said above, I won't ever consciously choose to eat gluten again because the effects on the guts are just too catastrophic. Reading labels more closely to be sure there is nothing hidden either cause it's just not worth the pain.

Dr John
Dr John 2012-12-11 15:21:34 -0600 Report

Your relative point is 2 hours after meals with gluten and without. You are not comparing before and after meals for this test. For example. In my case, my glucose was around 95, 2 hours after a 45 gram carbohydrate meal without gluten. My glucose was around 195, 2 hours after a 45 gram carbohydrate meal with wheat. I repeated this several times.

John

jayabee52
jayabee52 2012-12-11 15:40:06 -0600 Report

it would be done before and after meals with the gluten AND without. I believe it would give erroneous readings if you didnt account for the starting point of your BG levels pre meal. eacg repetition of tests after meals would be affected differently by the BG levels pre meal, or can one tell if your BG level is the same on different days. Even when I eat the same food all the time, there are differences in my BG levels from day to day (for instance) due to my possibly having an infection which raises my BG level.

I know that my BG levels do fluxuate from day to day even when I have similar inputs. I would expect yours would too.

Caroltoo
Caroltoo 2012-12-11 15:30:51 -0600 Report

That is exactly the type of response I have found that I have! Much easier to manage BGs without gluten.

I am a type 2 though, is the situation similar despite not being an autoimmune response? Regardless, gluten sensitivity leads to inflammation and reduced glutathione, doesn't it?

Graylin Bee
Graylin Bee 2012-12-11 16:36:51 -0600 Report

Carol, glad you are finding gluten is an issue with you. For me grains seem ti be a problem. Since oats, corn and rice are used in most gluten free baking, I only trade 1 problem with others. But I can use nut and seed flours or meals with no BG spikes. Now if someone is not able to have nuts due to allergies or kidney diet issues I hope to never have to solve that for my own personnal benefit.
The theory that it diabetes T2 is an allergic/inflamation caused/worsened issue is making more and more sense to me.

Dr John
Dr John 2012-12-11 15:32:32 -0600 Report

In type 1, you almost definitely will have this problem. In type 2, your chances are less, but may still have this problem. My test is the only way to know for sure.

John

jayabee52
jayabee52 2012-12-11 15:03:01 -0600 Report

one thing you failed to mention Dr John, is to test one's BG levels before each test to give a baseline to compare the postprandial readings against. That way when one compares the various tests you can find the number of BG points each has risen. Then one has a relatively reliable point of comparison.

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