What's New and Beneficial About Raspberries

MAYS
By MAYS Latest Reply 2012-09-15 20:11:34 -0500
Started 2012-09-14 20:18:58 -0500

One of the most fascinating new areas of raspberry research involves the potential for raspberries to improve management of obesity.

Although this research is in its early stages, scientists now know that metabolism in our fat cells can be increased by phytonutrients found in raspberries, especially rheosmin (also called raspberry ketone).

By increasing enzyme activity, oxygen consumption, and heat production in certain types of fat cells, raspberry phytonutrients like rheosmin may be able to decrease risk of obesity as well as risk of fatty liver.

In addition to these benefits, rheosmin can decrease activity of a fat-digesting enzyme released by our pancreas called pancreatic lipase. This decrease in enzyme activity may result in less digestion and absorption of fat.

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=food...

Anti-cancer benefits of raspberries have long been attributed to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory phytonutrients.

In animal studies involving breast, cervical, colon, esophageal, and prostate cancers, raspberry phytonutrients have been shown to play an important role in lowering oxidative stress, reducing inflammation, and thereby altering the development or reproduction of cancer cells.

But new research in this area has shown that the anti-cancer benefits of raspberries may extend beyond their basic antioxidant and anti-inflammatory aspects.

Phytonutrients in raspberries may also be able to change the signals that are sent to potential or existing cancer cells. In the case of existing cancer cells, phytonutrients like ellagitannins in raspberries may be able to decrease cancer cell numbers by sending signals that encourage the cancer cells to being a cycle of programmed cell death (apoptosis).

In the case of potentially but not yet cancerous cells, phytonutrients in raspberries may be able to trigger signals that encourage the non-cancerous cells to remain non-cancerous.

~Mays~


9 replies

Diabetic Coach
Diabetic Coach 2012-09-15 12:47:44 -0500 Report

MAYS, you are an endless supply of aawesome information. :) I LIVE for raspberries and all berries really. I was born with a pronounced strawberry birthmark over my "third eye." it was a major clue that I was going to be a berry lover. I dont know the meaning of the word 'moderation" with them and I don't eat them with anything else. Just a gigantic bowl of plain berries: straw, black, rasp, blue. LOL

MAYS
MAYS 2012-09-15 15:08:11 -0500 Report

Thank you for the compliment!
Aren't berries wonderful?

I like to take them, freeze them and then drop them in a blender and make either smoothies or mix a little apple juice and make my very own protein laden energy drinks!
The concoctions are endless, a little lactose free milk, berries (or any other fruit) and some protein powder and away we go!
Sometimes I will do a few chunks of melons (various) and maybe some very ripe pears with natural, unfiltered apple juice with a few pieces of shredded carrot.

I don't use a juicer for this, by using my blender I also get the benefit of fiber and pulp from the various fruits and veggies, something that you can't get from a juicer!
Enjoy your next big bowl of berries, and cherish that strawberry birthmark, it's one of a kind!…LOL.