Just A Reminder About Blood Glucose Testing (from Bayer)

MAYS
By MAYS Latest Reply 2012-09-05 16:39:14 -0500
Started 2012-09-05 16:39:14 -0500

Recognizing blood glucose patterns through blood glucose testing is an important part of your diabetes management when using insulin, especially if you are using multiple types of insulin or making several injections per day.

Fasting and pre-meal tests show how long-acting or background insulin controls blood glucose levels between meals and overnight.

Blood glucose testing after meals shows how food and rapid acting insulin, or mealtime insulin, are working together.

Looking at trends in your blood glucose levels and making changes to your diabetes treatment plan with your healthcare provider can help you achieve improved blood glucose control.

Check out the tips below to help manage your blood glucose levels before and after meals. For insulin tips on dining out, check out our Dining Out with Diabetes series, powered by Fit4D.

Before meals:

Low blood glucose levels may be caused by:

•Too much background insulin. The amount you take may need to be adjusted/decreased.

•Alcoholic beverages. If you consume alcohol, have it as part of a meal or snack containing carbohydrate. Ask your healthcare provider how to safely fit it into your meal plan.

•More physical activity than usual. Check your blood glucose levels before and after activity. Add a snack or decrease your mealtime insulin if your blood glucose levels are under 100 mg/dl.

High blood glucose levels may be caused by:

•Too little background insulin. The amount you take may need to be adjusted/ increased.

•Effects of your body’s hormones.

The dawn phenomenon is a rise in blood glucose levels in the early morning hours.

The Somogyi effect is the body’s response to low blood glucose levels overnight.

Both of these situations are caused by hormones produced by your body. Discuss with your healthcare provider if you should perform a blood glucose test in the middle of the night to learn more about how hormones may be affecting your blood glucose levels.

You may also need to adjust your background insulin or bedtime snack.

•Illness or stress. When sick or stressed check your blood glucose levels more often. You may also need to adjust your mealtime insulin.

•Less physical activity than usual. You may need to decrease your carbohydrate intake or increase your mealtime insulin. You may also need to increase your physical activity.

After meals:

Low blood glucose levels may be caused by:

•Too much mealtime insulin. The amount you take may need to be adjusted/decreased.

•Too little carbohydrate.

High blood glucose levels may be caused by:

•Too little mealtime insulin. The amount you take may need to be adjusted/increased.

•Too much carbohydrate.

Fine tuning your post-meal blood glucose levels:

•Manage your carbohydrate intake.

Because too much or too little carbohydrate can affect your post-meal blood glucose levels, try to maintain a consistent carbohydrate intake, refine your carbohydrate counting skills or learn to match your insulin dose to the carbohydrates you are eating.

•Perform a blood glucose test before and after your meals.

This information can help you identify trouble spots so your doctor can adjust your mealtime insulin dose.

Consult your healthcare provider before making changes to your treatment plan.

Written by: Fit4D Nutrition Coach Cindy Zwart, RD, LDN, CDE

~Mays~

Tags: information

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