diabetic monitors

jag2557@sbcglobal.net
By jag2557@sbcglobal.net Latest Reply 2012-03-21 23:51:56 -0500
Started 2012-03-19 12:42:25 -0500

I have a patient who has a tremor in her hands and is having difficulty using her monitor and giving her insulin. Has anyone out there found a monitor etc that works well when you have a tremor???
thanks


5 replies

Graylin Bee
Graylin Bee 2012-03-21 23:51:56 -0500 Report

Shaking hands have given me trouble when I was low and trying to test. Most of my meters can be left in their carry case when in use. This helps with holding onto the thing The main problems were:
unzipping the BG case
inserting the lancet in the lancet holder
taking lancet cover off of lancet without jabbing and scratching myself
opening the test strip container and removing a test strip
inserting the test strip into the meter
using the lancet
getting the itty bitty drop of blood onto the teensy weensy spot on the test strip
So basically every single step was a problem.
I seem to have about the same level of difficulty doing this with any meters I used when very shakey. A few times I just had my husband do most of the steps, if he was handy.
The larger lancet holders seemed easier to keep a grip on and pick up out of the case. Plus some are designed so it is not as easy to accidental change the deepth setting of the lancet. I have a few that I don't use because everytime I have to adjust the setting. It gets changed accidentally almost everytime I touch it in the wrong place.
If I always was that shakey I would probably opt for a meter that has the drums of test strips.
I wish they made lancing devices that were like the mechanical pencils that have several pencil points loaded in them. Use one, click to discard and the next one pops up ready to be used.

KarynCandy29
KarynCandy29 2012-03-19 13:16:47 -0500 Report

Hi,
My daughter has essential tremor,is your patient on Beta blockers ?
How old is your patient if you don't mind me asking?
My Aunt had it really really bad and ended up having Deep brain stimulation . It involves placing electrodes in the brain that are connected to a pacemaker-like device implanted in the patient's chest. The device sends small electric impulses through the electrode. The impulses interrupt the communication between cells involved in tremors. worked well for her..Have you tried the accu-chek one you can leave it in it holder when using it..

Caroltoo
Caroltoo 2012-03-19 17:01:57 -0500 Report

Good information. Didn't know about accu-check having a meter in a holder. I'd think hitting the small spot on the test strip would be really difficult.

I was considering this recently in the context of my husband's blindness. I have a talking meter and, just for an experiment tried to use just the verbal prompts which told me what was happening, but didn't help at all with finding the correct spot on the test strip w/out sight.

Graylin Bee
Graylin Bee 2012-03-21 23:21:34 -0500 Report

Several months ago they're were several posts from a lady who explained how to test who is blind. I saved the posts in case I needed to assist a blind resident with a BG Test.
Here they are from a word document.
Blindbluesmama
Ok, this is not how a *perfect* blind person checks blood sugar *perfectly. This is a realtime discussion from someone who is learning how to do this, that will hopefully help others struggling as I am and who have no help or very little.
The first thing I am learning is to be patient. It's not easy to check blood sugar when you can't see because the strips are designed such that there's only a certain little area about the size of the head of a pin that wicks up the blood. So patience, practice and be prepared to stick your fingers many many times at first. Sorry I know that's not what you want to hear if you're blind like me. The first thing you will need to do is examine the strip with your fingertips. I am not sure what to say if you can't feel the strip due to complications. But if you slowly explore the curvy round end of the strip you will notice that on the edge, there is a small notch. Can't feel it? Ues a finger nail. This is, I think, where you aim for with the blood. Ready set stick. Now prick your finger. I am still not sure where to prick exactly but it seems the general consensis that it's best to prick on the sides. Now, with any luck your finger will start to bleed. When it does pick up your meter and bring it to the blood not the other way around. In other words, hold the meter to the puncture site and hold it with the stuck out end of the strip, (the round end) pointed at the floor. Don't press but lightly touch. So far that's all I know. It's still taking multiple sticks to get a reading. But I'm determined. That isn't how my fiance put it last night when I wanted to test my blood glucose after we had already tested it. I did see reason and finally took a break from it and decided to wait til later. The worst part is that it takes so many sticks for me to either get the blood or get it on the strip. Anyway if you want to ask questions please do so. Well I'm yawning a lot, sign of low blood sugar I guess or maybe just because I only had three hours sleep last night.

Inspirition *gag* I'm sorry I know I *seem* like an inspiration but really I'm just like you. There is nothing I do special or different. Anyway, I am glad that you guys like this. This morning I just gave up. I still don't have a clue what my fasting blood sugar is. I'm feeling a bit queasy because I had to poke myself seven or eight times and still didn't get a reading despite having a pony tail band around my finger and using the lancit device from the other meter. And since I got blood on two strips, I'm on my third strip. I washed my hands in hot water and put the band around my finger. I am just frustrated. Not inspired or determined. I don't even care what my blood sugar is at this point.I am being, if not strict, careful. I suppose I'm gonna have to call my mom and see if she can show me how to do this. She's usually good at figuring out what I missed and will actually perform the test with her eyes closed, and try to think the way I would think. When she first found out I was blind at 11 month old, she learned how to walk around her house in the dark, without turning on the light whenever she had to go to the bathroom. I'm hungry and it's Darrell's day off and yesterday he got angry with me when I woke him up to check my sugar. He called me obsessive compulsive. Doesn't he get it that this is really important?
tried your hints with my eyes closed. First I could not remember which end of the test stirp was the end to insert in the meter. So I had to cheat and look. If someone had explained which end was which last year when I was learning I probably would have driven my husband insane the frst few months if I was blind. I would have kept forgetting. Then I was able to poke my finger but I could not tell if I had a drop of blood. So again I cheated and looked. After two attempts I made contact with the strip and got the reading. Thank you for prompting me to try. I am low and wouldn't have tested for another hour. I just thought I was shivering because the air blowing in the window is cold. Now I know I need to eat breakfst. And understand to a very small point why you would be frustrated to the point you are this morning. I wish I knew a way for you to tell if you had a drop of blood on your finger. Sometimes a bleed good and other times not so much so I would have to quess. I could not feel the blood, but I could feel the test strip and was able to slide it up to where I felt the sting from the lncet on the 2nd try. If I was trying this in a hurry, like yesterday when my BG dropped suddenly while I was at a meeting it would have been even more difficult. My hands were shaking so each step, sighted, was more difficult than normal.
Obsessive compulsive no way, wanting to feel and stay healthier yes. If people don't get it at first maybe they will after awhile. My family has begun to understan better as they have watched me over this past year.
Inspiration yes. What you do as a part of your everyday live has an impact on those around you. Sometimes that can be a motivation to continue to struggle, we never know who might be observing and find strength through us.

almost forgot, how you can remember how to put in the strip is like this. Shiny side toward the sky. Feel the strip there's a shiny side and a rough side on the bottom. The shiny part faces up, assuming you have your meter flat on the table with the screen facing up as well. Also look at the strip. You'll notice that in reguard to the short sides, one of the short sides is straight. The other one is in the shape of a fingertip, slightly curved. You put the strip in the same as your finger, with the fingertip opinting out. Also, if you feel the strips you'll notice a little bump if you start from the straight end. It's that bump that stops it from getting swallowed by the meter. It's also interesting to note that when Darrell takes blood from my finger he does it on the inside, in other words, if he were taking it from my left index finger, he would take it from the side that faces my middle finger. I'm sorry I can't tell you more about how to get your blood without poking your poor fingers to death.

Revising how to check blood sugar. I've done it twice now with only one stick. So here's how a totally blind person checks blood sugar without any help from little ones.
1. Wash hands. 2. insert strip into meter and pull lancing device which has already had a fresh sticker inserted. (see final step. 3. Insert test strip into meter. 4. On your finger that you're going to poke, locate the round bolge on the pad of your finger. It's the part that lies flat if you put your hand face down on the table. 5. Poke finger.
6. Now squeeze finger with thumb and index finger of your other hand and pay attention to when the blood starts to come. You'll know you have enough when you feel a soft squishy pop as the blood escapes your finger. 7. Hold meter with the short curvy end of the strip facing the flor and gently rub in the spot where you felt the blood. If you got enough, the meter should beep and say now testing and give a reading. It's important not to rub any of the flat surfaces of the strip, only the curved end that resembles a fingertip shape. Finally, remove strip and insert a fresh lancet. That way you don't have to do that step if your hands are shaking and you have to remove the used one anyway right? I hope this helps someone and I hope that maybe some of you will try this with your eyes closed and tell me whether I did a good job. One question I have is that people have often said never test on the pad of your fingers but I'm curious why? It's much easier to get blood that way. I could understand not testing on the top like where you would be if you were typing or playing guitar, and I can somewhat understand not testing on the pad if you're reading braille, but to eleviate frustration, it just seems easier to test on that bulgy place on the pad. 90 percent of my frustration was not being able to make my fingers bleed. I remember cussing at them. Bleed dang it. Except I wasn't so nice.

Goal to get a clear and easy to understand guide so that anyone who is blind can figure out how to check their blood sugar if this is your first time, feel the strip. If you're using a prodigy meter, the strip is shiny on one side and dull on the other. Also on the botom dull side the edge is slightly raised. Also, if you notice the two short ends, one is straight and the other is slightly curved. There's a little raised part near the bottom of the strip which stops it from going into the meter too far. So put the neter with the button side up and insert the strip, straight end first shiny side up, into the meter. It should say your prodigy meter is on. 2. Assuming your hands are clean, take the sticker and pull it until it clicks. Place the cap end in the place you want to prikck I use the pad of my finger. Press down firmly and then push the button. 3. Squeeze squeez squeeze. When you think you have some blood… 4. Take the meter in your other hand and very very slowly slide the end of the strip to the stinging place and then lay it flat. The key word is slowly. It takes me two or three seconds to do this. If I go too fast, the strip doesn't seem to soak up the blood and I throw a fit. If you do it right it should say now testing and then give you a reading. There, four easy steps. Again I invite all to try this with eyes closed The keys are sliding the meter to the site and doing it very very slowly I think. Like so many things blind people do, it's sort of a creppy crawly motion. The place that sucks up the blood is closer to the botom side than the top, which is why when you get to the site you lay it flat.

Revising how to check blood sugar. I've done it twice now with only one stick. So here's how a totally blind person checks blood sugar without any help from little ones.
1. Wash hands. 2. insert strip into meter and pull lancing device which has already had a fresh sticker inserted. (see final step. 3. Insert test strip into meter. 4. On your finger that you're going to poke, locate the round bolge on the pad of your finger. It's the part that lies flat if you put your hand face down on the table. 5. Poke finger.
6. Now squeeze finger with thumb and index finger of your other hand and pay attention to when the blood starts to come. You'll know you have enough when you feel a soft squishy pop as the blood escapes your finger. 7. Hold meter with the short curvy end of the strip facing the flor and gently rub in the spot where you felt the blood. If you got enough, the meter should beep and say now testing and give a reading. It's important not to rub any of the flat surfaces of the strip, only the curved end that resembles a fingertip shape. Finally, remove strip and insert a fresh lancet. That way you don't have to do that step if your hands are shaking and you have to remove the used one anyway right? I hope this helps someone and I hope that maybe some of you will try this with your eyes closed and tell me whether I did a good job. One question I have is that people have often said never test on the pad of your fingers but I'm curious why? It's much easier to get blood that way. I could understand not testing on the top like where you would be if you were typing or playing guitar, and I can somewhat understand not testing on the pad if you're reading braille, but to eleviate frustration, it just seems easier to test on that bulgy place on the pad. 90 percent of my frustration was not being able to make my fingers bleed. I remember cussing at them. Bleed dang it. Except I wasn't so nice.

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