WHICH CAME FIRST; DIABETES OR DEPRESSION?

Uncle Lew
By Uncle Lew Latest Reply 2012-01-26 19:19:54 -0600
Started 2012-01-21 20:41:30 -0600

The latest issue of Johns Hopkins Week In Review: WEEKLY ROUNDUP contained the following article- WHICH CAME FIRST; DIABETES OR DEPRESSION?

Below are excerpts from the article:

The link between diabetes and depression has long been recognized; many studies have shown that depression is twice as likely to occur in people with diabetes as in the general population. What's more, the connection is said to be "bidirectional," meaning that not only do people with diabetes have a greater risk of being depressed, but those with depression are at higher risk for developing diabetes — although the latter association is not as strong.

The second part of the study looked at subjects without depression who had pre-diabetes, untreated diabetes or treated diabetes. Researchers found that people with treated diabetes were 54 percent more likely to develop depressive symptoms over three years than those with normal glucose, and the same risk persisted after controlling for other factors.

Not a very pleasant a thought but its just another aspect of our disease that we have to deal with. And it is a lot better to deal with together than alone. As a family we can defeat anything that diabetes throws at us.


30 replies

smiles4all
smiles4all 2012-01-26 01:13:10 -0600 Report

depression after hypothyroidism, the thyroid started it all for me. It has been one thing after another, but, I WILL NOT GIVE UP

nzingha
nzingha 2012-01-24 09:24:53 -0600 Report

i've found now that i'm on insulin, whenever i'm getting hungry i get angry and cross..once i've eaten i'm calm again.. it's soo funny..my son says mummy u need to eat when i start to shout for the slightest of things…

Caroltoo
Caroltoo 2012-01-24 17:45:26 -0600 Report

That is also a symptom of low blood glucose, Eleanor.

nzingha
nzingha 2012-01-25 04:25:32 -0600 Report

true..also symptom that the insulin needs to be fed.. i swear.. then i am also having this crawling feeling in my left arm.. like things crawling up my arm when i eat.. sometimes when i eat i also feel a heaviness or is it a tightness in my feet.. has anyone else ever experienced these feelings? i'm geting a bit fed up sometims with these feelings… i'm going outside to walk in the cold now.. see how cold it is andd if i can stand up to it…

Caroltoo
Caroltoo 2012-01-25 07:12:04 -0600 Report

England's weather is "a bit of a challenge" after the more tropical weather you are used to.

Let's see what other's have to say about the skin sensations you are having. I can't complain of anything worse than an occasion, persistent itch. I would suspect a form of neuropathy, but your doc will hopefully check on that option. Are your feet swollen? That's kind of what the heaviness/tighteness in your feet makes me think of.

cavie2
cavie2 2012-01-26 01:25:35 -0600 Report

The English weather "a bit of a challenge" hmmmph, they're a bunch "o" woosies doon there. Now up here in Scotland when it's cold, wet, and windy the description the Scottish people have is "Awfally blowie" on the wee wifie scale. The wee wifie scale runs from "huffin" tae "haud oan tae ma breeks"

Caroltoo
Caroltoo 2012-01-26 06:34:35 -0600 Report

Consider the source, Cavie. Eleanor is from Jamaica and I'm from Hawaii. I used to live up on the Canadian border and acclimated to it when I was there, but it's been 20 years. I love your descriptions: haud oantae ma breeks indeed. I've been in those cold blows too!!!

nzingha
nzingha 2012-01-25 09:27:56 -0600 Report

yes my ankles swell when i sit with them hanging down for too long. i actually went for a walk and it wasnt that cold..my daughter has access to all these shops around so we can always just run across the street literally if we run out of anything.. very convenient.. i would love to hear if anyone else has these symptoms.. i swear this diabetes is attacking my nervous system. i have been using the treadmill and it feels better afterwards.. just did a few steps and will do some after i answer my e-mails just now. i hate this thing. just had some lunch which was lettuce, a tomato, 2 slices of whole wheat bread with nuts and ham and cheese. i had a cup of coffee and some nuts for desert. but believe me everytime i put food in my mouth i feel like i am killing myself.. next thing u know i will get some sickness that turns my mind off food completely! what a life?

Uncle Lew
Uncle Lew 2012-01-25 20:23:02 -0600 Report

Have you tried compression stockings to help prevent swelling. I have been wearing them for years and they work wonders.

red flower lady
red flower lady 2012-01-25 21:19:21 -0600 Report

I'm the diabetic, but because my husband stands for long periods of time, I talked him into wearing them. He said his legs felt much better, but he didn't like how long it took to get them on and off.

Uncle Lew
Uncle Lew 2012-01-25 23:06:08 -0600 Report

Yes it is a real pain getting them on and off. There are devices that can help you put them on but I don't know of any that will help you take them off.

Caroltoo
Caroltoo 2012-01-25 09:32:43 -0600 Report

Sounds good to me; I'm thinking about breakfast in the next hour.

Glad the weather isn't bothering you too much.

I sometimes sleep with my feet up on 2 pillows to help drain the fluid. Don't have to do this much now that I have stopped the Actos, but I do notice it mose when I've been at the computer too long.

nzingha
nzingha 2012-01-25 11:34:50 -0600 Report

u used to take actos\/ i think i'm alergic to lantos.. i got an appoitment for monday to see the docs here.. so will know whats causing all this upheaval in my body…

Graylin Bee
Graylin Bee 2012-01-22 20:50:49 -0600 Report

Does the article compare the rates of depression of people who have other chronic health problems? I seem to remember that heart problems and depression have a link. From just my own observations people diagnosed with Alzheimers' seem to have a high incidence of depression. Ditto for cancer, stroke, infertility, spinal cord injuries, etc.
Were the "other factors" just normal life stresses? Or did they factor in losses such as of jobs, family members due to death, divorce?
How lrge was the study? I have seen studies of very small groups of people, less than 50, tha are touted as a major reason to change the thinking on hows and whys of treatments and causes of diseases.
.

Uncle Lew
Uncle Lew 2012-01-22 22:01:41 -0600 Report

The answers to your questions can easily be found by going to Johns Hopkins Health Alerts and read the article.

Graylin Bee
Graylin Bee 2012-01-23 19:49:16 -0600 Report

Here's the info from their page
"The link between diabetes and depression has long been recognized; many studies have shown that depression is twice as likely to occur in people with diabetes as in the general population. What's more, the connection is said to be "bidirectional," meaning that not only do people with diabetes have a greater risk of being depressed, but those with depression are at higher risk for developing diabetes — although the latter association is not as strong.

What's the key to this connection? Researchers are still trying to tease it out, but both biological and lifestyle factors appear to be involved. Depressed people have elevated levels of cortisol, also known as the "stress hormone." Cortisol is a key player in blood glucose metabolism and insulin sensitivity, and high levels are also associated with increased fat deposits within the abdomen, a risk factor for type 2 diabetes.

Certain lifestyle factors also go hand-in-hand with both illnesses — including obesity, inactivity, smoking and poor eating habits. And the stress of managing a chronic condition has been shown to lead to depression.

What the Research Shows A major study in the Journal of the American Medical Association by Johns Hopkins researchers recently examined the two-way association. The investigators analyzed data from more than 6,000 people age 45 to 84 from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). The first part of the study, which analyzed participants without type 2 diabetes, found that those who displayed depressive symptoms were 42 percent more likely to develop type 2 diabetes within three years than those who weren't depressed. However, the increased risk was no longer statistically significant after adjusting for diet, physical activity, smoking status and alcohol use, illustrating that lifestyle factors play a larger role in developing diabetes than depression itself.

The second part of the study looked at subjects without depression who had prediabetes, untreated diabetes or treated diabetes. Researchers found that people with treated diabetes were 54 percent more likely to develop depressive symptoms over three years than those with normal glucose, and the same risk persisted after controlling for other factors. (Surprisingly, the risk was 21 percent lower for those with prediabetes and 25 percent lower for those with untreated diabetes than those with normal glucose, though it is unclear why.)

Important, the researchers point out that treated diabetes may lead to depression because simply being aware of your diagnosis creates psychological stress, sometimes called the "illness burden," which can lead to depression."

It answered some of my questions. But they still don't explain if their is a greater risk than with other medical problems that one is "aware of". I think it would be important to learn if people who are aware they have diabetes are at greater risk than if one has a different chronic medial problem or not.

jayabee52
jayabee52 2012-01-22 19:23:36 -0600 Report

Which comes first the diabetes or the depression?

in one word: "YES!"'

Young1s
Young1s 2012-01-22 19:43:32 -0600 Report

Hello James. I take it that you mean they come hand in hand? Or am I putting words in your mouth?

pixsidust
pixsidust 2012-01-22 12:43:55 -0600 Report

I do find that diabetes affects my moods
I have less tolerance
but I am also starting into menopause
I am not full blown yet but close
so my moods could be from that
I did not have depression but was tired and sick
It could be some associate depression with the lethargy
that accompanies being tired
while others are depressed

Caroltoo
Caroltoo 2012-01-22 13:01:22 -0600 Report

Feeling bad affects my moods … doesn't matter what the cause is, if the body aches or throbs or ??, it's very likely to effect my level of calm and patience with what ever is going on around me.

Young1s
Young1s 2012-01-22 11:34:48 -0600 Report

I hope I never experience depression over being diabetic, but can understand why it occurs. This disease is controllable but time, energy and spirit consuming. Staying positive about the fact that I can live life as a diabetic helps me a lot. Having a strong support system at home is key as well. And lets not forget that coming here and talking things out, listening to others experiences and hopefully passing on some helpful advice or words of encouragement, can be therapeutic for us all.

Caroltoo
Caroltoo 2012-01-21 23:22:14 -0600 Report

I developed Diabetes. I have not had depression, with the exception of SAD which is triggered by low light during the winter and resolves when the sun returns (or you take D3 and B12). I would attribute this lack of depression to my willingness to meet the world head on and resolve whatever it's throwing at me…and there has been lots over the years. Like Temi, my response to problems is: ok, what's happening, how can I change it or me, where are we going from here? The attitude doesn't really allow for depression.

I think the closest I have been is with this last year of Wayne's illness. I feel very stuck in place and not at all in control of what is happening. I can plan for the contingencies, but it's all at the, If A happens, then B stage. I will feel less stuck when I can move forward again. I don't wait in place very well. Even so, I'm not so sure this is depression; I think it is pretty normal grieving for a man I have lived with and loved for 36 years.

TsalagiLenape
TsalagiLenape 2012-01-21 23:12:28 -0600 Report

Actually I had bouts of depression. Yet never was tested at the time for diabetes. May of had it since then I dont know. But I have learned to deal with my depression in a unique manner where I find out what has made me depressed and what solutions I can come up with to beat it. Then move forward. I dont want a "pill" to fix me. That dont work at all whatsoever. So I have to find ways to deal and move on. Which I do rather well for the most part. If not, I talk it out. But not too many listeners around anymore. Oh well. Just focus and stay strong.

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