Hello everyone Happy New Years to all.

demetria1969
By demetria1969 Latest Reply 2012-01-03 05:34:28 -0600
Started 2012-01-01 19:28:25 -0600

I just have been told that I am diabetic. At the beginning of last month, I had to change my whole food intake. And it is killing me. I had a real bad scare, after being released from the hospital. No one advised me that my sugar would spike even though I am know on insulin. My sugar levels on my first test at home was 460 and I rushed my self back to the hospital. Where I stayed for 12 hrs. Before I received any treatment. Was I in the right to demand help, or being a little parnoided?


17 replies

Denisency213
Denisency213 2012-01-02 11:33:17 -0600 Report

Hi everyone I was just diagnosised last week and I'm terrified I'm in the medical field so I am aware of all the complications. I have been placed on pills and sugars are still all over the place. My question is did anyone experience fasting sugars in the 200s is this normal

jayabee52
jayabee52 2012-01-03 05:34:28 -0600 Report

Yes this is normal for the first few days, weeks, months.

If this continues more than a couple weeks talk to your Dr and see if your meds may need some adjustment.

Young1s
Young1s 2012-01-02 08:46:32 -0600 Report

Hello Demetria1969. Welcome to DC. If you are looking for support, answers to questions, information on all things D (diabetes), sillinest, venting…you've come to the right place.

I was in your shoes, hospitalized for a pancreatitis flare up and finding out I was Type II. I did everything that was expected of me, including giving myself daily shots of insulin, but my numbers were still high. I started a discussion about my concerns and was comforted by the fact that my body would get used to the new meds and lifestyle. It just needed a little time. And it did.

Because you are new to this, it probably was a good idea to get yourself back to the hospital. However, as James said, your body needs time to normalize so don't stress yourself out at every high. Stick with the classes, they'll help a lot. Despite the attitude of your doctors, keep asking those questions and demanding information from them. It's their job and you don't ever want to feel in the dark about what going on with your healthcare.

And of course, come here and talk to us…about anything. There's usually someone here who has gone through or is going through some of the same things. We're not professionals but we can offer you some suggestions that you may not have considered, lead you to information, listen when you need to get stuff off your chest, you name it. So, don't be afraid to ask questions and/or get involved in other discussions as well.

Happy New Year to you and be blessed.

demetria1969
demetria1969 2012-01-02 12:22:57 -0600 Report

Thank You I need some sound advise from people that are in the know. I was in the medical feildvand found it to be very depressing so I got out only to return to Addiction Specialist as well as Testing Counselor. It is very hard to be on this end of the scope. How do I deal.

Young1s
Young1s 2012-01-02 13:18:45 -0600 Report

Considering I only learned about my D a few months ago, I can't say I'm completely in the know. However, I do try to be a sponge and soak up as much information as I can. It is hard. And repetitive and somewhat time consuming. But I look at it as a challenge, of which I am up for. It's also fun at times; learning new things about D, figuring out how to cook a new way, etc… It just takes time to get your mind wrapped around it all, but you will. Then again, maybe not all. Because those who have had D for years are still learning and trying new things, to this day.

Caroltoo
Caroltoo 2012-01-02 12:32:55 -0600 Report

Demetria: Learn, study, empower yourself, and take charge of it. The same basic things we tell our clients, but also need to live ourselves. Carol

Caroltoo
Caroltoo 2012-01-02 16:20:26 -0600 Report

There are lots of things we can share that are informational, but the most effective approach for me is the strengh's based one of taking care of myself.

jayabee52
jayabee52 2012-01-01 22:26:33 -0600 Report

WELCOME to DC demetria! Sorry you qualify for our "little" family but since you do I am glad you are here.

There is a saying: "Just because you're paranoid DOESN'T mean that somebody is NOT out to GET YOU!"

You did well to get yourself to a hospital for a high such as that you reported. It is better safe than sorry! Who knows, your Blood Glucose (BG) levels could have kept going up if you hadn't taken action when you did.

Since your profile seems to be unfinished, I don't know what kind of Diabetes you have. But if you are type2 It may take a while for your numbers to normalize. It may also take a bit of time for you and your GP (or endo) to get the type of insulin and the right dosage to normalize your BG readings.

give it a bit of time, but in the mean time, high BG numbers like that 460 (really anything over 200) needs attention quickly.

Also give your mind a bit of time too to adjust to thinking like a Person with Diabetes (PWD). Keep asking questions here too! The only foolish question here is a HONEST question which is NOT ASKED!

demetria1969
demetria1969 2012-01-02 01:00:37 -0600 Report

Well Thank You for your return email. I was told that I have type two diabetes. I had a bad case of pancrentiuis, and everything was a completly out of no where I was fine one minute and the next thing I had to get myself to the hospital. I started classes, and went and bought the right type of food all in one failed swoop. And the doctors seem to be offended if you question, things that they tell you. I feel crazy and out of control and I am a bit anal when it comes to myself.

jayabee52
jayabee52 2012-01-02 01:23:24 -0600 Report

Well if it is the RIGHT kind of anality (is that even a proper word?) it can be good for you.

Your feelings of being "crazy and out of control" are usual for newly Dx'd, and even some Persons with Diabetes (PWDs) have them from time to time.

I have had diabetes for about 16 years and I am finally getting a really good handle on managing it. I spent a lot of years in denial, and burnt out and mimimizing it. But this past year I had taken the bull by the horns and started managing it without using any diabetes medications. You don't have to take as long as I did. But for much of those 16 years I felt totally alone and didn't have DC available to me (until about 3 yrs ago).

To your better health

James

demetria1969
demetria1969 2012-01-02 00:59:58 -0600 Report

Well Thank You for your return email. I was told that I have type two diabetes. I had a bad case of pancrentiuis, and everything was a completly out of no where I was fine one minute and the next thing I had to get myself to the hospital. I started classes, and went and bought the right type of food all in one failed swoop. And the doctors seem to be offended if you question, things that they tell you. I feel crazy and out of control and I am a bit anal when it comes to myself.

Set apart
Set apart 2012-01-01 20:38:59 -0600 Report

Hi Demetria, I am 48 and am a T1 also or 1.5 or LADA. Welcome no you were not paranoid 4 months into this and it still scares me. My BGs are going crazy these days so am increasing my Insulin with DEducator's help, scary stuff hmm now let me see how many units should I take? I am my own guinea pig so stick to your guns I ask for help all the time!

Dawnnie
Dawnnie 2012-01-01 20:24:12 -0600 Report

Hello Demetria1969,
Is the 1969 the year you were born? The reason I ask is to get an idea of how old you are with this new diagnosis. I am assuming you are considered type 1 or 1.5, is that correct?

Dawnnie
Dawnnie 2012-01-01 20:26:00 -0600 Report

I am 40 and was diagnosed last year. I am type 1.5 and I know exactly how you feel about the whole food intake.

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