Diabetes

Frustrated mom
By Frustrated mom Latest Reply 2008-11-05 14:50:51 -0600
Started 2008-11-05 13:55:52 -0600

Does Diabetes affect one race more than the other?


5 replies

teddybearcub1960
teddybearcub1960 2008-11-05 14:50:51 -0600 Report

I know that is why I am so concerned about my grandchildren, as my son-in-law is of Mexican decent and I know there is a greater chance of them being diabetic, and there are also native Indian on both my husband's and my sides of the family. So that really worries me, that's why I am trying to get my daughter to watch them very closely for diabetes with them.

bucky
bucky 2008-11-05 14:06:12 -0600 Report

Non-Hispanic white people with diabetes: 13.1 million, or 8.7 percent of all non-Hispanic whites ages 20 years or older have diabetes.

Non-Hispanic black people with diabetes: 3.2 million, or 13.3 percent of all non-Hispanic blacks age 20 years or older have diabetes. After adjusting for population age differences, non-Hispanic blacks are 1.8 times more likely to have diabetes than non-Hispanic whites.

Hispanic/Latino American people with diabetes: After adjusting for population age differences, Mexican Americans, the largest Hispanic/Latino subgroup, are 1.7 times as likely to have diabetes as non-Hispanic whites. If the prevalence of diabetes among Mexican Americans was applied to the total Hispanic/Latino population, about 2.5 million (9.5 percent) Hispanic/Latino Americans age 20 years or older would have diabetes. Sufficient data are not available to derive estimates of the total prevalence of diabetes (both diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes) for other Hispanic/Latino groups. However, residents of Puerto Rico are 1.8 times more likely to have diagnosed diabetes than U.S. non-Hispanic whites.

American Indians and Alaska Native people with diabetes: 99,500 (12.8 percent) of American Indians and Alaska Natives age 20 years or older who received care from IHS in 2003 had diagnosed diabetes. 118,000 (15.1 percent) of American Indians and Alaska Natives age 20 years or older have diabetes (both diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes). Taking into account population age differences, American Indians and Alaska Natives are 2.2 times more likely to have diabetes than non-Hispanic whites.

Asian Americans and Pacific Islander people with diabetes: The total prevalence of diabetes (both diagnosed and undiagnosed diabetes) is not available for Asian Americans or Pacific Islanders. However, in Hawaii, Asians, Native Hawaiians, and other Pacific Islanders age 20 years or older are more than two times as likely to have diagnosed diabetes as whites after adjusting for population age differences. Similarly, in California, Asians were 1.5 times more likely to have diagnosed diabetes than non-Hispanic whites. Other groups within these populations also have increased risk for diabetes.

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