An early warning for blood sugar level changes

hubba hubba
By hubba hubba Latest Reply 2011-11-30 14:25:24 -0600
Started 2011-11-29 00:17:43 -0600

To many years after a sister was diagnosed type1 I began following the Mediclim 24 hour e mail alert system for weather changes that are known to affect such conditions as Diabetes and Migraine, looking further into this I recently found some info about how blood sugar level changes in winter and summer affecting insulin requirement.
Now it all makes a lot more sense, after WW2 the 'western diet became the norm and we now know antibiotics to which we owe so much have been abused by sometimes overworked Doctors, concerns have also grown about antidepressants being misused just like antibiotics is it then so surprising that so many conditions that are increasing today involve lhypogllycaemia. Many decades later we are all much more aware how it all affects blood sugar levels and the Mediclim system is one way we can moderate an extreme sensitivity of blood sugar to weather changes whatever time of the year they occur. Beyond all this we can do more, much more for our childrens sake by educating them by example not to repeat our mistakes. A recent polish study confirmed once again that 'Westernisation' is the big factor in increasing diabetes, so lets get it right on a personal level it's more about MODERATION than Westernisation not just to manage our own health problems but more importantly to leave our decendents a health legacy that protects them
tomorrow from what we know today can be largely prevented. Genetics is a powerful medical tool yet the evidence is now beginning to indicate environment plays the dominant role in auotoimmune diseases. We have so much to be grateful for in the freedom of the Western world not least the freedom of choice to be more healthy as a nation.


11 replies

annesmith
annesmith 2011-11-29 00:53:26 -0600 Report

I have noticed without a doubt that whenever a warm front comes through our area, it NEVER fails, my blood sugar goes very very unstable…I have finally found newer and better ways to prepare for this ahead of time…I still don't have all the answers, but, here I thought it was my imagination…it's not. Every single time a warm front came through, especially in the spring , summer, and yes, even wintertime, my body would not go to sleep at night…I started eating more pasta, as I ate zero pasta for years…and I started eating garlic of all things—it's done WONDERS for me—-garlic and pasta have helped me tremendously—I must have been low on most of that stuff…I wonder what in the heck a WARM FRONT has to do with my blood sugars though? I seriously would like to know—it's not food…my guess is that it affects the blood vessels in the body—the warm front, and in turn my diabetes is affected—-geez, without a doubt , warm fronts do not agree with my diabetes—-summertime is really really really bad for me——I fall into lows very QUICK when it heats up outside anything over 88 degrees, and before I started taking more precautions I would shake like a LEAF, my sugars would fall fast and really low—into the 50s———ANNE

hubba hubba
hubba hubba 2011-11-29 13:22:25 -0600 Report

Thanks Anne your comment on warm fronts is very interesting. Start with Dr Wernher Becker and his team at University of Calgary who investigated the effects of warm Westerly winds called "Chinooks", also the work of Dr Felix Sulman who working in same field discovered an association with serotonin and depression symptoms. I am now wondering if the warm fronts you mention especially in the spring , summer, and yes, even wintertime appears to tie in with seasonal changes around the spring and Autumn Equinox, Diabetes I recall reading sometime ago has a seasonaly higher diagnosis particuarly in winter when Melatonin is produced for longer due to longer hours of darkness, Melatonin is a source of Serotonin so it makes sense to me that when daylight hours increase from the spring equinox there will be extra Seratonin for that spring feel good factor-weather permitting.

annesmith
annesmith 2011-11-29 23:12:48 -0600 Report

Wow…that all makes sense. I never really though of that…I take Melatonin as a diabetic insomnia sleep pattern remedy year round now. When daylight hours increase it must change the body's natural sleep cycle and melatonin and serotonin levels . I was told I do not produce enough of either melatonin or serotonin…interesting…thanks for the information…sincerely, ANNE

Caroltoo
Caroltoo 2011-11-29 17:56:08 -0600 Report

Perhaps another part of the issue is that it is commonly accepted fact (don't know if it's documented) that people who live in cold climates eat more carbs during the winter months than they do during warm weather. Saw this regularly when practicing in the Pacific NW. Sometimes this was connected to SAD, sometime just to the cold.

Regardless, if cold=increased carb intake, it could also related to increased dx rates during the winter.

Caroltoo
Caroltoo 2011-11-29 00:29:08 -0600 Report

Yes, our diets and lifestyles have changed in ways that are called "progress" but in fact have led to serious health issues. Moderation of life style and eating habits can improve this tremendously.

I don't see you offering any information that connects this to the weather as an early warning of blood sugar changes. I'm really curious about that.

hubba hubba
hubba hubba 2011-11-30 04:24:55 -0600 Report

The recent finding that serotonin has an active role in the immune system has really opened up the subject.
Source: Georgetown University Medical Center
Date: 20 January 2006
Commonly Used Antidepressants May Also
Affect Human Immune System
Drugs that treat depression by manipulating the neurotransmitter serotonin in the brain may also affect the user's immune system in ways that are not yet understood, say scientists from Georgetown University Medical Center and a Canadian research institute.
That's because the investigators found, for the first time, that serotonin is passed between key cells in the immune system, and that the chemical is specifically used to activate an immune response. They do not know yet, however, whether these SSRI (selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors) drugs "including the brands Prozac, Zoloft, Paxil and others" could have either a beneficial or a damaging effect on human immunity.