Are You Your Own Spin Doctor?

russellstamets
By russellstamets Latest Reply 2011-10-17 20:05:10 -0500
Started 2011-10-16 12:16:24 -0500

I spend arguably too much time staring at the graph of my morning fasting Blood Sugar measurements. The trend line is my view to the past, present, and future of how I fare in my battle with diabetes. I can draw that trend line in drastically different ways. Which way do I choose at any given time? To appear positive, of course! Today, as a point in time, is a good example. By changing the polynomial order of the Excel trend line tool, I can tell different stories, although only for recent times. Long term, it’s less manipulable (Note: hope these image links work. If not, they're at http://russellstamets.blogspot.com).

Trend Scenario for 10/16/2011 using polynomial order “3”. This would be the pessimistic view that after the drastic drops in July/August, I’m trending back up to soon be above the “diabetic” line again and toward required insulin use.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/Q_JCzy5oMu4...

Trend Scenario for 10/16/2011 using polynomial order “5”. This would be the probably overly optimistic tea leaf reading. The spin for this view would be that after a little bump from the stress of the initial going public online with my story, the last couple of days show me trending back down.

https://lh6.googleusercontent.com/27ScjY2-vtY...

Trend Scenario for 10/16/2011 using polynomial order “2”. In true Goldilocks fashion, the middle of the road interpretation is my choice today. Little up trend yes, but explainable, and sweetened with the observation that daily swings are drastically dampened and stabilized. Yes! This is the view that the Russell News Channel will go with today.

https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/1GEq6gzMA06...


3 replies

annesmith
annesmith 2011-10-17 00:14:12 -0500 Report

POLYNOMIALS…that reminds me of my first year of Algebra when I was in high school…ha, ha, ha. I guess you had better get used to the poly part of diabetes, as one internist told me I was polydiabetic, …so, I wish you the best of luck. I need to get more strips, as I just skipped yesterday and today…I don't make a lot of money and I work 2 jobs. Explain this one: My after meal 3 days ago was 500 something, pretty typical for most of my after meals…my after meal 2 days ago, after eating a bigger meal was way down to 122…WOW…what a change…I hope all is going okay for you…sincerely, ANNE

russellstamets
russellstamets 2011-10-17 08:57:54 -0500 Report

Hi Anne, all's well with me. 95 this morning after two 111's in a row the last two days. I use one strip a day. Never more. Just the one morning fasting test. I have no idea what my body's doing the rest of the day. But it doesn't seem to matter because the 90-day average of those once-a-day readings matches the every 3 month A1c lab test. Testing more would make me crazy. As well as cost more. And what would I do with those after meal and other numbers? My entire game is about consistency. The more my body trusts me to eat well and regular, keep activity up, and stress down, the more it' settling down. You can see from my graph that the swings form day to day are much lower now than a couple of months ago. I know I'm lucky though. At other times in my life, money, stress, and the time it takes to treat my body right, would've been problems.
Take care. Russell

annesmith
annesmith 2011-10-17 20:05:10 -0500 Report

That's good that you have been able to keep it down to 111 and 95. It sound like your averages are good, but a doctor told me a few years ago that even if your fasting is good, that if a person hits say 500 or 600 or even 400 after meals and 2 hours, it can do damage to the eyes and limbs —-so, for example, your body may kick out just enough insulin to keep your fasting number in a really super good range, but, if after you eat a meal, 2 hours later, if you do not have enough insulin supply then, and you hit 350 or more, you get bad damage done there, too———I did not fully realize that—-I suspected it for YEARS, as I have years of untreated childhood diabetes. Take care, and hope all goes well with you…sincerely, ANNE