re: salt

elizag1
By elizag1 Latest Reply 2012-02-03 13:22:52 -0600
Started 2011-09-21 15:47:49 -0500

Is 'sea salt' the same as just salt?


25 replies

TSasabuchi
TSasabuchi 2011-09-25 00:37:21 -0500 Report

No. Sea salt is salt straightout of the sea or ocean, aand is usually orangeish/tan. tplain salt is white because manafacturers usebleach and flow chemicals to make itpour easy and more appealing. Sea salt is way better foryour health, and is usually 100% natural

Carol2x
Carol2x 2011-09-23 23:45:32 -0500 Report

My husband and I do not use salt at all and the food we get has to be either real low salt-or no added salt at all. When you don't use salt you can really taste it when some foods have it. Some of the food we get has some salt as it is made with it-but, we keep it to the bare minimum as your body does need some salt.

jayabee52
jayabee52 2011-09-24 00:05:48 -0500 Report

I have been on a lowered salt menu for quite some time, I can really taste it when there is too much salt in a food prepared in a resturaunt. Yuck!

Uncle Lew
Uncle Lew 2011-09-23 19:57:55 -0500 Report

Here is some interesting numbers comparing true sea salt and table salt.

Table Salt , 95% pure, is 57.629% Chloride and 37.370% Sodium
Sea Salt contains 55.03% Chloride and 30.39% Sodium

Table Salt, 95% pure, is 95% NaCl and 5% other minerals
Sea Salt is 85.62% NaCl and 14.38% other minerals.

Most of the sea salt in supermarkets is nothing more than coarse table extracted from sea water (maybe). Almost all of the other minerals have been refined out. Going to specialty stores could provide you with a gamut of different tasting sea salts. These salts taste different because of the mineral content in the part of the world they are from. You can find some very expensive gourmet sea salts. The sodium content per gram is lower than table salt because there are other minerals in it.

One thing to remember is that you will use more sea salt to achieve the same salt taste you have with table salt and therefore defeat the purpose of sea salt. I went to a no salt added food regimen 47 years ago and I love it. You will find out what the food actually tastes like. A new and interesting experience. :-)

margokittycat
margokittycat 2011-09-22 09:08:45 -0500 Report

Sea salt is actually better for you than regular salt. It is not processed as much and it has minerals in it that are great for you. It does not take much sea salt to flavor things you use less than 1/2 the amount of sea salt as you do regular salt. Most companies that do a sea salt get it from the natural resources and then clean it. Mortens has a great sea salt I love it.. I bought a contain two years ago and because I don't have to use as much it is still half full. You can use it in a pepper grinder like you do the whole black pepper seeds if you but the little crystals which is what I buy. But my doctor say's it is a lot healthier for you and even good for those with high sodium levels due to the indiscreat amount that you have to use compared to regular salt.

MrsCDogg
MrsCDogg 2011-09-22 05:56:04 -0500 Report

Salt is like any other food. The more processed, and fiddled around with the worse it is. I personally prefer sea salt firstly for the taste and secondly for the minerals. Good sea salt still has all the minerals in it. I think it's way healthier than the other kind.

jrpaulk
jrpaulk 2011-09-22 00:40:34 -0500 Report

I'm not a Doctor but…I have always been under the impression that salt is salt. Whereever, whatever, however.

Maui wisper
Maui wisper 2011-09-21 18:49:43 -0500 Report

My Dr. told me your body can get rid of sea salt easier than reg salt.

jayabee52
jayabee52 2011-09-21 19:22:37 -0500 Report

Did Dr give you a reason why s/he might say that?

According to the American Heart Assn. website: http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/High...
from the article: ". . . these attributes (*) may make sea salt more attractive from a marketing standpoint, Johnson says there are no real health advantages of sea salt."
(* these attributes are: " minimal processing, and therefore retains trace levels of minerals like magnesium, potassium, calcium and other nutrients.")

Drs are human and can be taken in by marketing hype too.

Maui wisper
Maui wisper 2011-09-21 19:36:35 -0500 Report

My blood pressure had dropped, and Dr.s could not keep it up. I was in I C U for a week and my organs started to shut down. When I went back for a follow up at her office i asked if I should start using salt, Thats when she told me if I'm going to use salt, to use sea salt. She said the body can get rid of sea salt easier than reg salt.
I dont know…Its hard sometimes to know who to trust. I have not started using any kind of salt.

jayabee52
jayabee52 2011-09-21 19:59:35 -0500 Report

My bride "Jem" Had problems with keeping her salt balanced becaise due to her Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) she had to take diuretics, and she took so many diuretics and had to urinate so much that her sodium numbers were down quite a bit, so she had to load up on salt for a while. Her body always seemed to go out of balance so easily. She would have too much water in her system and then the next day she had too little water. From blood test to blood test one would never know just how her test numbers would turn out.

She drove the Drs and nurses who were charged with her care a little bit batty at times. But I have to give her medical team a lot of credit, because they kept her alive and functioning for 20 years with her CHF before she passed. But she was a real loving person to her medical team and to me.

jayabee52
jayabee52 2011-09-21 16:58:12 -0500 Report

As far as chemical comopsition Salt is NaCl (sodium plus chlorine) no matter whether it is sourced from a salt mine, or is evaporated from out of sea water. The sea salt may have other chemicals or minerals with it, and that gives it a unique flavor. Otherwise there is no difference.

ShellyLargent
ShellyLargent 2011-09-21 16:28:17 -0500 Report

Here's a link to an article written by the Mayo Clinic: http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sea-salt/AN0... Hope it helps answer your question.

MEGriff1950
MEGriff1950 2011-09-21 16:35:59 -0500 Report

Shelly this is an excellant article. I copied the last sentence to paste here.
" And limit total sodium to less than 2,300 milligrams a day — or 1,500 milligrams if you're age 51 or older, or if you are black, or if you have high blood pressure, diabetes or chronic kidney disease." My dr says try to keep it under 800 mgs a day. Just to give some an idea the Arby's crispy chicken sandwith has 1,250 mg of sodium.

jayabee52
jayabee52 2011-09-21 18:12:40 -0500 Report

I have noted that a lot of the meat which Arbys serves taste overly salted to me. But I just put that off to me being particularly sensitive to salt since I don't normally eat a whole lot of it.

MEGriff1950
MEGriff1950 2011-09-21 20:09:37 -0500 Report

You can go online to the many chain food restaurants and get the nutrition information before you get there.

Type1Lou
Type1Lou 2011-09-22 08:01:01 -0500 Report

There are also some books that provide that info (and undoubtedly some apps for ipods and such that I don't have) I carry "Dana Carpender's New Carb & Calorie Counter" that has listings for 35 fast food restaurants. That's where I discovered that my all-time favorite fast food (Taco Bell's Mexican Pizza) has 45 grams of carb and 530 calories…double OUCH!

MEGriff1950
MEGriff1950 2011-09-21 15:52:52 -0500 Report

If you are on a low sodium restriction my guess is yes. If you aren't and do not have edema then it might be ok. We all need sodium in our diets but most people get what they need from their foods naturally without adding more.