Halloween

Della - 24193
By Della - 24193 Latest Reply 2010-10-23 09:10:56 -0500
Started 2008-10-14 15:12:02 -0500

My son was just diagnosed with type 1 and has to take 10 units of lantus a night. What are some suggestions on what to do for Halloween? Its always been one of his favorite holidays and now that he cant have the sweets what do I do ?? HELP!?!?


11 replies

max'smom
max'smom 2010-10-23 09:10:56 -0500 Report

Last year was the first year of being a T1 for my 8 yr old. After trick or treating we let him pick out a few pieces of candy then he and his 5 yr old brother traded their candy in for money. $0.10 a piece and then we let them go shopping at their favorite place..the Lego Store. It's always a challenge but cover the few pieces of candy with the insulin, they are still kids then put it away and they tend to forget after a few days anyway. They can still have a small piece of candy but change the focus. Money helps!

momoftype1
momoftype1 2008-10-17 14:03:43 -0500 Report

Trick or treating for kids is more about the costume and the walk. My daughter is type 1 and she does it. We are going to handle the candy a little different this year-maybe the great pumpkin, but I always let the kids pick out a zip lock sandwich bag of candy for themselves to keep. They are monitored and we count her carbs when she does have candy. Then I take the leftovers to work and put in a candy jar on my desk in my office.

If you let him be involved in which candy he keeps it will make it easier. I also take it out of the house when they are not around so there is no chance for any issues.

Good luck and have fun-

Dawn

vgarrison
vgarrison 2008-10-16 18:46:54 -0500 Report

Della,

I heard the greatest idea on here the other day. Let him pick out a few of his favorite pieces and then have him leave the rest for "the great Pumpkin". While he is sleeping the great pumpkin will come and leave him a present for the candy. I don't know if this is something that would work for you or not, but I am going to use it this year. Even though my 3 year old isn't diabetic, I am so afraid that having all that candy in the house will kill me…I am over weight to begin with, and my philosophy has been, I didn't get this way over night, and I'm not gonna change over night.

IT might work for you, give it a thought.

Vicki
Blessed Be

PAT L
PAT L 2008-10-14 15:44:50 -0500 Report

LET HIM GO AN HAVE FUN AN WHEN HE GETS HOME TAKE ALL THE CANDY FROM HIM AN REPLACE IT WITH CANDY THAT HE CAN MUNCH ON, YOU CAN GET IT AT A DRUG STORE AN THAT WILL MAKE HIM A HAPPY LITTLE GUY. THIS IS WHAT WE HAVE DONE WITH A LITTLE GAL DOWN THE STREET AN THAT LETS HER HAVE THE FUN OF THE DAY.. OH THEN WE GIVE THE OTHER CANDY AWAY TO THE OTHER KIDS…

Lee Ann - 22107
Lee Ann - 22107 2008-10-14 15:54:39 -0500 Report

I assume you mean replace it with SF candy? SF candy is awful. Bleh, I grew up eating that, and I can't stand the thought of kids getting unnecessarily tortured with it today. The carb counts in that stuff is comparable to regular candy, plus there's the not-so-lovely laxative side-effects. Every 'betic is different, but I'd say most of the T1's I've talked to say that those sugar alcohols still raise BG so there's really no good reason to use them, and they really do taste terrible.

T1 kids can have regular candy, they just have to consume it in small portions.

Della - 24193
Della - 24193 2008-10-14 15:58:31 -0500 Report

Yeah so far the sugerfree stuff weve gotten him he eats bujt he kinda just nibbles. not really caring. But It is a good idea though . Im just at a loss. And ready to pull my hair out.It seems like so much to have to do .I guess it will get iesier as we go huh?

Lee Ann - 22107
Lee Ann - 22107 2008-10-15 06:54:30 -0500 Report

There are always new challenges with diabetes. An initial diagnosis certainly causes a lot of upheaval and confusion, but that will get better as you learn more specifics about management, and how to incorporate them into your life. I know Halloween is still a couple of weeks off. It's my hope that you're able to get an appointment with an RD/CDE in the time between now and then. They can best help you find a balance that allows your son to have some candy (and a relatively normal Halloween) without compromising his health.

Lee Ann - 22107
Lee Ann - 22107 2008-10-14 15:30:14 -0500 Report

Well, don't take my advice without talking to your doctor, but I eat candy. I know the carbs, and I take insulin to cover. I ate peanut butter cups a couple of hours ago as a matter of fact. I'm in great control and my weight is normal too, so i'm not compromising my health to have that bit of freedom.

It's just important to understand the carbs and fit them into his diet accordingly. If he's not taking a basal insulin, I'm going to guess that you at least have some limit on carbs per meal (??). If that's the case, find out the carb counts for any candy he gets, and parcel it out over time, fitting it in his nutrition plan. Instead of 30 carbs of rice, give him 15 carbs, and a fun-size candy bar - or something like that.

Having grown up with T1, there's just nothing worse than being excluded from the stuff other kids get to do and being made to feel different. There's really no justifiable reason to keep him from enjoying Halloween just like every other kid. You just have to do it smartly and talk to your diabetes educator or doctor about how to make it work.

Della - 24193
Della - 24193 2008-10-14 15:55:30 -0500 Report

Actually they didnt tell us anyhting about how many cars to have or not to have . and we have no dietician. How would I go about getting him one?

Lee Ann - 22107
Lee Ann - 22107 2008-10-15 06:48:07 -0500 Report

Are you seeing an endocrinologist for his diabetes management or a family doctor? An pediatric endo is the way to go if possible. They would be better able to link you with a registered dietician (RD), preferably a certified diabetes educator (CDE). An endo would very likely have one working right in their practice. Otherwise, you can ask your family doctor for a recommendation. The other option is to find one through your health insurance.

It's really important to have continuing diabetes education. They often bombard you with info when you're first diagnosed, but it's so much info and you're already in some kind of haze trying to adjust to the diagnosis, that it's impossible to retain all the info. Conversely, some people aren't given enough info when they're first diagnosed because health care providers don't want to overwhelm someone, but they don't necessarily specify the importance of follow-up and regular education.

caspersmama
caspersmama 2008-10-14 15:59:55 -0500 Report

I eat candy too. I love hersheys cars and kisses. It is the carbs not the sugar you need to watch more. And the sugar free candies I have tried are good. Russell Stouvers has a line that is great. I love the caramels. I do not have the laxative problem. But when I want candy I eat a fun snack size. And I am type 2 on insulin.

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