so.....

denatrout1974
By denatrout1974 Latest Reply 2011-05-09 06:56:12 -0500
Started 2011-05-08 15:29:12 -0500

ok now heres a question i would like to have answered if anyone can,now i know we r suppose to check bs am ,one to two hrs after a meal,becouse our bs can spike,and we need to be careful of this but what about right after we eat?does r blood spike alot more than someone who is not dm,and what r the affects of r bs right after a meal?


6 replies

Graylin Bee
Graylin Bee 2011-05-09 01:28:39 -0500 Report

I forget where I found this chart.
RECOMMENDED BLOOD GLUCOSE GOALS

ADA:…A1C..<7.0…Fasting…90-130…PP*…<180

JOSLIN:…A1C..<7.0…Fasting…90-130…PP*…<160

AACE:…A1C..<6.5…Fasting…110…PP*…<140

NON-D:…A1C..4.0-6.0…Fasting…70-100…PP**.70-140…**Non-diabetic

*ADA: "Post-prandial glucose measurements should be made 1–2 hours after the
beginning of the meal, generally peak levels in patients with diabetes."

ADA = American Diabetes Assn. Joslin = Joslin Diabetes Center AACE= American
Association Of Clinical Endocrinologists Non-diabetic= ranges compiled from goals
of all agencies.

MAYS
MAYS 2011-05-08 17:40:15 -0500 Report

It depends on many factors, the main ones being "what" was eaten and the "rate of time" that it takes for it to be digested and released into our blood stream.

Some foods and the combinations thereof are digested faster than others.

I suspect that there is no difference in whether or not the individual is diabetic or not for the speed of the spike to occur, but due to the inability of a diabetics body to operate "properly" the spikes are more noticeable for a longer period of time than usual.

Straying away from the subject a little, this link may interest you:

http://www.thelifeco.com/food-combining-chart...

~Mays~

Harlen
Harlen 2011-05-08 17:24:14 -0500 Report

First test after two hr if you tes after only one you will not get a ajustible #
we do spike more then non D but its not a lot ,
It seams to me that a short spike will do no harm ,It takes time for the food to get into you blood just like it takes time for your insulin to get in.
I always give my insulin before I eat
Best wishes
Harlen

Kirla
Kirla 2011-05-08 17:23:32 -0500 Report

I don’t know about non diabetics. I tested my mom once. I tested her while she was eating and then 1 hour later. She read 110 while she ate and one hour later she read 180. I think she might be pre diabetic. I told her to have her doctor add an A1C test next time she had blood work done. Never herd anything more about it from her. Once I measured my wife and her blood sugar was 70 something. I tested my sister once when she got home from work and she read 70 something. That’s all I know about non diabetics.

If you would like to know how non diabetics blood sugar works you could always test your husband and kids before and 1 hour after eating. If you have lots of strips you could try testing them before they eat and then every 15-20 minutes their after until there blood sugar drops. I think it should take about 1 hour after they eat to find out.

When you eat your blood sugar starts to rise. It will rise for about 30 minutes to 1 hour after eating. It will peak at about the 1 hour mark most of the time. I believe in testing my peaks. It’s the only way to really know how the foods you eat are affecting your blood sugar. I used to think I peaked at the 1 hour mark for all meals. I found out I was wrong.

How you find your peak is to eat then every 15-20 minutes do a test. Your blood sugar reading will keep going up and then it will start to fall. When it starts to fall you know you reached your peak. One day after lunch I decided to test 30 minutes after eating. My blood sugar reading read 179. I couldn’t believe it. My blood sugar at lunch went from around 90 to 179 and back down to around 80 all in 1 hour. I had to check when I peaked for each meal after that. I now check 1¼ hours after breakfast. 25 minutes after lunch and 45 – 60 minutes after dinner. By doing lots of testing I learned that we peak at different times for different meals. I heard high carb sugary food will spike you at about 30 minutes. I don’t eat that kind of stuff so I haven’t tested it myself.

I stopped eating foods that spike my blood sugar more than 40-50 points after eating. What you set your level too is up to you. I believe we need to keep the peaks under 140. I read somewhere that anything over 140 does damage.

When diagnosed my A1C was 14.1 and fasting blood sugar was 366. It only took my blood sugar about 6-8 weeks to approach normal reading. My A1C dropped to 5.9 in 4 months. Has remained below 6 ever since. Been 2 years and blood sugar is still doing good.

Good luck
Kevin
http://kirla.wordpress.com/