Afraid of what's to come...

By Mizzgreenjeanz Latest Reply 2011-04-09 19:55:10 -0500
Started 2011-04-06 04:39:53 -0500

I am new here but I am also new to diabetes on the whole. I was diagnosed in an Emergency room where I was taken via ambulance after I became severely dehydrated from gastroenteritis. The ER doc was not friendly or helpful and said I should be seen immediately because the acetone test they did showed I'd had elevated #'s for sometime now and was definitely diabetic…then he left. I just sat there in shock. Somedays I think I am still in shock…however, I went home and threw out all the nasty carb rich foods I was eating and went on a low carb diet. I lost 6 pounds in two weeks through diet and exercise and that's just so far. I immediately tried to get an appointment with my doctor but since I am seen by the VA clinic I could not get one until tomorrow…two weeks and several days I waited and worried. I have been charting my blood sugar since right after my "diagnosis" in the ER. It's never been below 178. It's been as high as 280. For the most part it stays in the 190-200 range. Steady usually unless I am not sleeping well because of stress. Like last night! This appointment at the doctor has me out of sorts! I am super afraid that he will suggest insulin. I have a hard enough time psyching myself up to poke my finger for the tiny drop to test. Needles??? I am afraid I might have to ask my spouse to help me atleast in the beginning. He was willing to do that with the lancing device for testing…it kind of freaked me out at first…yeah, I'm a big baby. What on earth will that do to our marriage??? I am praying and hoping that when the doctor sees the direction I'm headed in with diet and exercise that he will ONLY prescribe oral meds. Is that pretty common? Anyone have a similar story in numbers that just went on oral meds and was able to get off them quick? That's my dream…hope…major source of stress these days. Say a prayer for me or send up a kind thought…today is the day I find out. 9:30am appointment. What a nail bitter this is turning out to be!

20 replies

Jim Edwards
Jim Edwards 2011-04-07 11:10:20 -0500 Report

When I was diagnosed, I was shocked because it was a routine exam. The real shock was a lot of foods that "are good for you", are not necessarily good for you when you have diabetes. I believe that if you eat well and exercise you can get it under control quickly. Sadly, I was never one to exercise so it is a proverbial uphill battle. As far as the ER is concerned, I told my wife the only way I want to go to the ER in Winchester, VA is if I am dead. I was in at 7PM and was not seen by a doctor until 3:30AM and that was only after I upchucked in the waiting room.

Pynetree 2011-04-07 10:07:03 -0500 Report

…sadly, I am not amazed at ER Dr.'s brush-off treatment. Too much the norm today. He was rushed, probably tired, and he is un-caring and insensitive. (Two of these faults can be fixed.)
But thrilled that your care at the (VA ?) Dr. was so through, and concerned!
VA gets too little good press, so it's great to hear a good review!
One hint, that has helped me is to journal everything…your a.m. BloodGlucose reading, how you are feeling, what you ate, BG two hrs. after,what exercise you got, everything you do. It takes a bit of time, but the results will show you, and your Dr. how your body reacts to different foods, what spikes it, what stress does, etc. it really heps make you more accountable, and you'll learn to work your carbs into your day to avoid huge spikes…or lows.
Good luck. You have found a great site, with lots of knowledgable, caring people.

donna62M 2011-04-07 08:27:47 -0500 Report

I'm amazed that they let you go without telling you what you needed to do to help bring everything under control…When I was diagnosed I was put in hospital had test ran, and was seen by a diabetic educator, and started on meds before going home to see my GP…It is stressful enough with out getting help straight away…I wish you the best of luck in your journey that has just started…and wish you luck with the doc.

Mizzgreenjeanz 2011-04-07 00:16:17 -0500 Report

Just a hint… my a1c was 11.4… scary. I can't wait to see what it is in three months though with all the changes I've made!

Pynetree 2011-04-07 10:14:09 -0500 Report

My first A1c was over 14, my second…almost a yr. later was 11.?, Then I got smarter. Now it's been below 7.0 for many years..last one was 6.3.
But you are gaining knowledge and working the new lifestyle changes, so I'm sure it will be much lower by July.

Mizzgreenjeanz 2011-04-07 00:06:28 -0500 Report

Thank you all for your support! It's been fantastic knowing that I'm surrounded by people who care here! My doctors are excellent and are making sure that I eat JUST the right things. I spent 4.5 hours at the docs today getting educated and learning about diabetes. Since I've seen changes already with diet and exercise the doctor put me on metformin twice a day to try to bring my sugar into controlled numbers. She's confident that in the future I will be able to manage without the need for insulin (except perhaps if I was ever hospitalized and wouldn't be eating for several days…then she said I might need some but that's emergency only!) I was so much more confident! Thankfully she also gave me some pills to help me with sleep as well…so my insomnia will no longer get in the way of my schedule. I'd been testing TOO much for her. LOL I guess overkill is better than under! :) Sending my sincerest thanks to each one of you. Without your words of support and wisdom and prayers…I may have lost it today! I was able to keep my sugar as low as possible by avoiding the crazy stress! LOVE this place! :)

donna62M 2011-04-08 08:12:17 -0500 Report

glad thea this doc was better at giving you the info you needed…try not to worry about the needles because you are not likely to need them for a long time if ever…good luck

Graylin Bee
Graylin Bee 2011-04-07 08:33:39 -0500 Report

WOW. Sounds like you have a fantastick Dr. Glad you got lot of info. Knowledge is power when dealing with diabetes.

RAYT721 2011-04-06 21:18:41 -0500 Report

Hey Kiddo … welcome to our family! How did you make out at the doctor appointment??? Your fears and tears are quite normal. I think we've all had them. Let us hear more from and about you. This truly is a great group of people with genuine concern, understanding, motivation, inspiration and education to share. You're not alone!!!

MoeGig 2011-04-06 19:22:06 -0500 Report

Shots are not that big a deal…and insulin may well be the best way to stabilize your situation. The instability of trying to stabilize you blood sugar with pills often creates more problems. Insulin is what your body needs, often, not the pills that do other things to maximize your existing insulin output.

MrsJgKENT 2011-04-06 18:54:45 -0500 Report

oh hugsssssss to you! I am so sorry you had an ER Dr that was a jerk!!!! I hope you will take a deep breath and try to think of happy thoughts. It is scary and you will have many questions this place is good for hearing what works for other people… I do not have to do shots or meds …but my Dad does and He now does shots and He don't like them but He knows he has to do them. WE will do what we have to do. I hope you will have a blessed day and know you have prayers for you…

Kirla 2011-04-06 18:42:10 -0500 Report

It can be done. I did it. I believe others can too.

Feb 2009 I was diagnosed with a fasting blood sugar of 366 and A1C of 14.1. Started to eat a salad every day at supper. Also started to eat lots of low carb vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, cucumbers, spinach, pickles and sauerkraut. Started to drink 8+ glasses of water every day.

I then bought a meter and started to test my blood sugar before and after each meal. At first I was testing 2 hours after each meal and when my numbers dropped a lot I started testing 1 hour after meals. I was testing 5-7 times a day. I cut back or eliminated foods that spiked my blood sugar more than 50 points after eating.

By testing I found that foods like bread and most foods made of grains along with pasta, rice, corn, potatoes, oatmeal, cereals, chips, crackers, cakes, cookies, candy, soda, fruits, fruit juices, milk and most foods that contain more than 5-6 net carbs per serving as found on the package label all spiked my blood sugar. Some people can cut back on these foods and some people like me have to stop eating them.

After about 6-8 weeks my blood sugar readings were almost normal levels. After 7 weeks I quit all meds and my numbers continued to get better and better.

I found by reducing and eliminating high carb starchy foods helped me a lot. By adding small amounts of chicken, beef, pork or a hard boiled egg to my meals helped reduce blood sugar spikes also.

Good luck

Peg61 2011-04-09 19:55:10 -0500 Report

Your advice has helped me in so many ways. I am fortunate to be able to reach out to you and others in this forum. Thank you

realsis77 2011-04-06 10:29:10 -0500 Report

Hi. I'm here to tell you I take insulin and its not bad at all! I too was afraid at first but it turned out to be the best thing to happen to me. I have much more enegery and feel better all around! The shots don't hurt at all , it hurts more to prick your finger for testing! If done correctly you honestly won't feel it. That's the truth! I chose to use my upper thighs to inject into instead of my stomache. Its been working out wonderfully. I now have almost perfect blood sugar and I never thought id say that! Its been amazing! Insulin is NOT a punishment it IS a tool to help keep your blood sugar under control and it works great! If you have any questions you can always just ask and I will be here for you! Not ALL diabetics can control there diabetes with pills and diet. I couldn't. So remember insulin is a good thing! Make sure they teach you how to inject if you do require insulin! I wish you the very best and please keep us posted on how your doing ok? Let us know what happens. Don't be discouraged if you have to take insulin. You will feel so much better for it! :)

Nonna2Three 2011-04-06 09:26:15 -0500 Report

We can't live in fear of whats to come - that just adds to our stresses which in turn preys upon our BG numbers. We have to take one step at a time, one day at a time and face each new obstacle when we get to it.

Don't worry about "if" the doctor will put you on insulin. If he does then just double your efforts to get your numbers down consistently enough that he will take you back off insulin.

I was diagnosed 01-17-11 with a BG of 612. I was immediately put on pills and insulin injection. Lantus (slow acting insulin) at bedtime and Humalog (fast acting) before each meal along with 500mg Metformin twice a day.

I cut out sugars, switched to diet soda, eliminated as much carbs as possible and started eating breakfast. By day 40 I was taken off the insulin. I now manage with pills, diet & exercise.

I realize that as my body ages and the function of different organs diminishes that there is a possibility that I will no longer be able to keep my numbers controlled with pills, diet& exercise. But until then I will not let that worry me and eat away at my small steps and successes along the way.

And, BTW, I dreaded the shots most of any of the changes this disease brought to my life, but I found that they were NOT as bad as i feared. I did have my hubby give them to me in the beginning, but I quickly discovered that I could give them to myself with less issue than having him give them.

Remember - one step at a time, one day at a time and face each new obstacle when we get to it.

dietcherry 2011-04-06 06:49:19 -0500 Report

Deep breaths…we all know, all too well, just how you feel. The ER Dr. was incredibly insensitive to you-lets hope his plate was full to overflowing and he took a moment later to realize his mistake.
The first thing you did was the right thing to do…going home and clearing out from your life and kitchen the things that dont have a place in your brave new world.
You are doing a great job with your blood sugar numbers and dont worry about insulin shots right now; your Dr. will guide you through that if and when the time comes. And so will we.
I encourage you to gather as much information as you can, at your own pace; the scariest part of a D diagnosis is the not knowing. I promise. Arm yourself with knowledge and it will ultimately relax your mind.
You life is about to change, is already changing, but the choices you make today will decide your tomorrow. There is a ton of experience, insight, and friendship at DC and good people who are ready to share it with you.
YOU ARE NOT ALONE and we are all here for you! Just ask! Lots of Love! Renee :)

Patty johnson
Patty johnson 2011-04-07 07:46:45 -0500 Report

Hey dietcherry,
I just confirmed you as a friend. I really like your words here. I hope they comfort mizzgreenjeanz! I am happy to say that I had my year tests and my A1C is @ 6.5 (six months ago @ 7. 1 yr ago it was 14! At 1st diagnosis.) My BG was over 495! I now have it managed and keep it @ 100. I take up to 3 shots Novolog and use Lantus for my overnight dose. I have learned that I can bring my BG down at least 15-30 units by taking a 2 block walk on break at work. I didn't have time to be scared when I got my diagnosis 1 yr ago. I had to jump right in and give the shots all at once. I also take 1000 mgs Metformin 2x day. Boy, I feel so much better!!! I had absolutely no idea I had D… I went to D classes and looked up all I could about my new BFF (Diabetes) and we are very close and will be for life. I definitley cut down the carbs but if I want a sweet or something I adjust it into my meal plan and adjust my insulin dose as well. I take 1 unit of insulin for every 15 carbs and limit the carb intake to 30-45 at @ meal. My Lantus shoy went from @ 36 now down to 22 units.
So I find comfort in your words also.
Mizzgreenjeanz— Please don't be afraid of the shots, they truly don't hurt and YES, the prick to get blood for your BG test hurts the worst!! Yes, the upper thigh area works well, and I switch off from them and my stomach. Only because at work I take 2 of my 3 shots at my work desk so I use the tummy. It's not that bad either, but thigh is better for sure. I am one that has to take the shots and Metformin for life and I accept that. So I am "slowin' my roll" in life and switched to the right lane down this big D highway and wave at those passing me on the left. Take care and welcome mizzgreenjeanz! ..pJ

ibcathy 2011-04-06 06:42:28 -0500 Report

While everyone with diabetes is different, generally oral meds is the first choice of most doctors. The fact that you lost weight and are actively trying to control things with diet and exercies (and it is working to some degree) is a good sign. However, I take insulin as my numbers go as high as 600 without it, remember that insulin does not mean you are doing things wrong. You just need that extra "boost" for lack of better wording.

I am so sorry you had your hospital experience. I found our I had Congestive Heart Failure that way so I understand how you are feeling. Doctors can be our greatest allies, but sometimes some of them really lack compassion. Additionally, in an ER, there is the added problem of time constraints.

Good luck with the doctor today. I will be sending thoughts and prayers. Oh, the insulin needles aren't bad. It takes some getting used to but I did that very quickly. They don't hurt (very small). Again, you are in my thoughts today.